Dr. NOYES Arthur Amos, Ph.D.

Dr. NOYES Arthur Amos, Ph.D.[1]

Male 1866 - 1936  (69 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name NOYES Arthur Amos 
    Prefix Dr. 
    Suffix Ph.D. 
    Born 13 Sep 1866  Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Census 29 Jul 1870  Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • (age 4.)
    Census 14 Jun 1880  Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    • (age 13.)
    Education 1890  [1
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
    • Received his doctorate after also studying at Leipzig.
    Census 7 Jun 1900  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • (age 33; chemistry professor; living with his mother.)
    _UID 1F940D38EB9ED5118A064445535400002796 
    Died 3 Jun 1936  Pasadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 7
    • OBIT: On Wednesday morning, June 3, Arthur A. Noyes died of pneumonia at Pasadena, California, three months before his seventieth birthday. During the past twenty years in which I have been intimately acquainted with him he has never been in robust health, and two years ago he underwent an operation which further weakened his resistance and from the results of which he suffered continually until the time of his death.

      Few men have played a larger role in the development of American science than Arthur A. Noyes. He was born in Newburyport, Mass., on September 13, 1866; took his bachelor's degree in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1886, his master's in 1887 and the next year went to Leipzig and started organic chemical research with Wislicenus, but under the influence of Ostwald soon joined the group of young men who were then devoting themselves to the creation of the new subject of physical chemistry. After taking his doctorate in Leipzig in 1890 he rerturned to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and for ten years was actively engaged in that institution in teaching analytical, organic and physical chemistry. During this period he published his well known work on qualitative analysis which has exerted a very large influence in this country. Also during this period he carried out with his students so many researches on the ionic theory of electrolytes that he became recognized both here and abroad as one of the most outstanding leaders of American chemistry. In 1903 he established at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and became the director of the first Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, and for seventeen years personally contributed half the expense of its maintenance. He never married but devoted every ounce of energy that he possessed to the development of his chosen field, chemistry.

      Nothing reveals the extent of Noyes' influence better than the roster of the output of that laboratory in men, for on it are found such names as W.D. Coolidge, G.N. Lewis, W.C. Bray, R.C. Tolman, C.S. Hudson, E.W. Washburn, R.B. Sosman, W.D. HArkins, John Johnston, C.A. Krauss, F.G. Keyes and others.

      The wide sweep of his influence is also shown by the fact that he acted as president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1907-1909, and was president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1927. In the councils of the American Association, the National Research Council and the National Academy of Sciences he was universally felt to be as objective a thinker, as wise a counselor and as discriminating a formulator of policies as could be found in this country.

      From 1913 on he began to divide his time between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology, and in 1916 organized, built and became the director of the Gates Chemical Laboratrory, the first building after Throop Hall to rise on the campus of the latter institution.

      The contribution of Arthur A. Noyes to the creation of the California Institute of Technol;ogy, to which he devoted his whole time after 1920, is beyond all measure. His rare judgment, his fertile immagination, his conscientious devotion to the institute's welfare, his long educational experience and profound understanding, his breadth of vision, his research enthusiasm, his unwavering forward look, his innate refinement (he was a great lover of poetry) - all these qualities combined to make him a man of rare ability and effectiveness. But he was more than an able man; the far reach of his influence came from the fact that he possessed the greatest and the rarest of all qualities, complete unselfishness. When he had once seen clearly a great objective, he forgot, as few men I have ever known have been able to forget, all about his own place in the picture.

      This is why he was the trusted advisor of all who knew him, faculty and students alike. This was the secret of his influence. The world is quick to sense, to appraise and to follow a character that everyone can trust. Over and over again our enterprise might have been ruined if a man of narrower vision and smaller soul had been a guiding spirit. Over and over again he deliberately pushed his own interests out of the picture and chose the course which led to the remoter but larger goal. With his early arrival on the scene and his great prestige and influence, he could easily have followed the course which lesser men would have undoubtedly pursued and built this institution around himself and his department; but he realized that the larger objective required that other departments be made significant too, and he threw his own energies into building them, sometimes even at the immediate expense of his own. He spent more time that any other man on the campus trying to create here outstanding departments of physics, of mathmatics, of the humanities, of geology, of biology and of the various branches of engineering, and what these departments are today they owe more than they themselves know to Arthur A. Noyes. The breadth of his vision is shown by the fact that from the first he was the foremost and most effective advocate of the view, first, that really great engineers can not be produced in an atmosphere that ignores the fundamental sciences upon which all engineering ultimately rests, and, second, that neither effective scientists nor engineers can be created in an atmosphere which is not permeated by the background of the disciplines that deal with human values, motivations and experience. In all the fields in which the institute thinks that it has done and is still doing educational pioneering, Arthur A. Noyes has been the leader. The last great act of his life was altogether typical of the man. He had been pondering, as he was always doing, over the needs and the opportunities of the institute, and he saw clearly another step having nothing to do with chemistry that had to be taken; but he knew the financial difficulties in the way. So he went to the trustees and said, "Take what this costs out of my own personal income but do not hesitate for a moment to take this necessary step." Is it any wonder that we at the institute feel that the atmosphere of mutual assistance and self-forgetting cooperation toward a great ideal which has been created here and which is today the most priceless asset of this institution is largely the legacy of the mind and the soul of Arthur A. Noyes? We can not pay the debt which we owe to him by any words of eulogy or praise. "It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us," that the spirit and ideals and accomplishment of Arthur A. Noyes shall not perish from the earth.

      Robert A. Millikan
      California Institute of Technology
    Buried Altadena, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Address:
    Mountain View Cemetery and Mausoleum 
    Arthur Amos Noyes monument
    Arthur Amos Noyes monument

    ARTHUR AMOS NOYES
    BORN SEPT. 13, 1866
    DIED JUNE 3, 1936

    Notes 
    • NOYES, Arthur Amos, chemist, son of Amos and Anna (Andrews) Noyes; grandson of David and Harriet (Cook) Noyes, and of James Henry and Ruth (Bott) Andrews, and a descendant of Nicholas Noyes, of Newbury, Mass., who came to America from England in 1635. He was graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S., 1886, M.S., 1887; was assistant and instructor in organic chemistry at the institute, 1887-88, and 1890-93; was graduated from the University of Leipzig, Ph.D. in 1890, and was appointed assistant professor of chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1894. He edited the Review of American Chemical Re-[p.99] search, published monthly by the American Chemical society, and is the author of: A Detailed Course of Qualitative Chemical Analysis of Inorganic Substances (1895); The General Principles of Physical Science (1901); and, with S. P. Mulliken, Laboratory Experiments on the Class Reactions and Identification of Organic Substances (1899); also of forty original papers describing researches in theoretical and organic chemistry.

      U.S. chemist, inventor and educator. He received a PhD in 1890 from Leipzig University under the guidance of Wilhelm Ostwald.

      He served as the acting president of MIT between 1907 and 1909 and as Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology from 1919 to 1936. "Although [the Noyes] laboratory at MIT was like an institute in its intramural funding (from Carnegie Institute of Washington and Noyes's patent royalties), Noyes recruited many of his disciples as undergraduates and took a deep interest in undergraduate engineering education, both at MIT and later at Caltech.[1][2] Roscoe Gilkey Dickinson was one of his famous students.

      Noyes was a major influence both on the educational philosophy of the core curriculum of Caltech as well as in the negotiations leading to the creation of the National Research Council along with George Ellery Hale and Robert Millikan. He also served on the board of trustees for Science Service, now known as Society for Science & the Public, between 1921 and 1927.

      Noyes–Whitney equation
      Along with Willis Rodney Whitney, he formulated the Noyes–Whitney equation in 1897, which relates the rate of dissolution of solids to the properties of the solid and the dissolution medium. It is an important equation in pharmaceutical science. The relation is given by:

      }=-C)}}} }=}-C)}}
      Where:

      }} } is the rate of dissolution.
      A is the surface area of the solid.
      C is the concentration of the solid in the bulk dissolution medium.
      } C_} is the concentration of the solid in the diffusion layer surrounding the solid.
      D is the diffusion coefficient.
      L is the diffusion layer thickness.
    Person ID I14939  Noyes Family Genealogy
    Last Modified 11 Mar 2019 

    Father NOYES Amos,   b. 27 Sep 1831, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Sep 1896, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Mother ANDREWS Anna Page,   b. 14 Aug 1846, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Apr 1904, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Married 12 Oct 1865  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 9
    Family ID F5673  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Arthur Amos Noyes
    Arthur Amos Noyes
    Wikipedia

    Documents
    Institute Pauses at Noyes Bier
    Institute Pauses at Noyes Bier
    Pasadena Post
    6 June 1936
    Career Ends For Famed Savant
    Career Ends For Famed Savant
    Pasadena Star News
    3 Jun 1936
    Noyes: Chemist preferred to work behind-the-scenes
    Noyes: Chemist preferred to work behind-the-scenes
    Pasadena Star News
    6 May 1991
    Noyes: Chemist preferred to work behind-the-scenes (page 2)
    Noyes: Chemist preferred to work behind-the-scenes (page 2)
    Pasadena Star News
    6 May 1991
    One of Original CalTech Trio Is Taken
    One of Original CalTech Trio Is Taken
    undated
    uncited
    Pasadena Public Library Bio Collection

  • Sources 
    1. [S589] Book-Encyclopedia International, 7172-0700-5., 13:300.

    2. [S65] Book-Noyes-The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I, p.274.

    3. [S896] Correspondence-Internet-Gail Noyes, 23 Jan 2000 6:13 pm.

    4. [S4270] Census-1870-MA-Essex-Newburyport, Roll: M593_611; Page: 220A; Family History Library Film: 552110.

    5. [S3469] Census-1880-MA-Essex-Newburyport, Roll: 532; Page: 519C; Enumeration District: 227.

    6. [S2764] Census-1900-MA-Suffolk-Boston, Roll: T623_680; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 1307.

    7. [S82] Death-obit, Science Magazine, June 26, 1936; p.613.

    8. [S3808] Internet-Find A Grave, Find A Grave Memorial #6608869 [Reggie Hudson] 10 Jan 2019.

    9. [S4295] Internet-DB-NEHGS-Mass. VRs, 1841 through 1910, 182:110.