Notes


Tree:  

Matches 80,401 to 80,450 of 80,588

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
80401 World War II Veteran. STITHAM Gordon Lester (I503)
 
80402 World War II veteran. PALLOTTA Gerald J. (I878)
 
80403 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I71290)
 
80404 World War II veteran. SAWYER Mahlon Chase (I71287)
 
80405 World War II Veteran. STITHAM Gordon Lester (I1777)
 
80406 World War II. Ensign NOYES William H. (I73954)
 
80407 Wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill. AMES Spofford (I91826)
 
80408 Writer, Social Reformer. The author of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," an antislavery novel of such power that it is cited among the causes of the American Civil War, Harriet Beecher Stowe was also an advocate of women's rights, religious tolerance, and educational reform. She was the daughter of Lyman Beecher, a well-known religious leader, and the former Roxana Foote, a devout woman who died when Harriet was 4 years old. Although painfully shy and considered an "odd" child, she was intellectually gifted, and received an excellent education at a school founded by her elder sister Catharine. In 1832 she moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where her father had been appointed head of a local seminary, and in 1836 married Calvin Stowe, a widowed biblical scholar who taught at the school. The next 14 years proved stressful, with Harriet giving birth to 6 of their 7 children, including a set of twins. Often in ill health and deeply grieved by the loss of a child to cholera, she struggled to supplement her husband's meager income with her writing. These hardships deepened her empathy with the suffering of others, however, and life in close proximity to Kentucky, a slave state, provided her with the material for "Uncle Tom." While visiting the South she had witnessed the brutality of the plantation system first-hand, and she also housed fugitive slaves in her home. In 1850 her husband's appointment to the faculty of Bowdoin College brought her to Brunswick, Maine, and it was here that Mrs. Stowe wrote her masterpiece, galvanized by the passage of the newly enacted Fugitive Slave Law, which criminalized the assistance of runaways. When "Uncle Tom's Cabin" appeared in book from in 1852, it swiftly became both controversial and an international bestseller. Denounced by its critics as Abolitionist propaganda, it was lavishly praised by such literary giants as Tolstoy, Hugo, and Heine, and catapulted its author to fame at home and abroad. After the Emancipation Proclamation, Stowe focused greater attention on other social reforms. Her subsequent literary efforts fell short of "Uncle Tom's" success, although her 1869 biography of Lady Byron generated almost as much controversy for its allegations of incest. Personal tragedy also stalked her family, claiming the lives of 3 of her adult children, among them her son Frederick, an alcoholic war veteran, who disappeared without a trace in 1870. Her nephew, the distinguished soldier Frederick Beecher, had been killed 2 years earlier in the Indian Wars battle which bears his name. Widowed in 1886, Stowe's elder years were spent in Hartford, Connecticut, where she enjoyed the neighborliness of Mark Twain and Oliver Wendell Holmes, and occasionally, a little too much wine. "I won't be any properer than I have a mind to be," said the octogenarian authoress. When she died at 85, survivors included her unmarried twin daughters, her youngest son, and her favorite brother, the celebrated Henry Ward Beecher. (bio by: Nikita Barlow)
 
BEECHER Harriet Elizabeth (I111038)
 
80409 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I117936)
 
80410 Wrote a letter from France inquiring about status of lot 441 in Mt. Auburn Cemetery. DENNIS Helen E. (I44199)
 
80411 Wrote family genealogy. ALLEN Edwin Tracy (I21762)
 
80412 WWI Army 2nd Lieutenant

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

WWI, Army Air Service, 2nd Lieutenant. 
ATWATER Donald Vince (I423)
 
80413 WWI veteran DRAKE Allen Everett (I140)
 
80414 WWI veteran - he served as a PFC with the 334th Guard & Fire Co., 4th Pro. Bn. NOYES Benning White (I76555)
 
80415 WWI veteran. NOYES Walter Herbert (I40761)
 
80416 WWI, Army Air Service, 2nd Lieutenant. ATWATER Donald Vince (I1210)
 
80417 WWI. Joined the National Guard 1914. Sent to the Mexican border. Stayed in the Guard and was a Sergeant in Company F, Eighth Regiment of Infantry. Later in France to the First Supply Train and served in five major battles. NOYES Alfred Byron (I15952)
 
80418 WWI. Joined the Navy and served on the USS San Diego. The San Diego was sunk off Fire Island in April 1918 before 11 am, "when the USS San Diego is believed to have struck a mine that was left by the German submarine U-156. The explosion crippled the San Diego's port engine and caused explosions in the boiler room." Gun crews, according to published reports, shot at anything they thought might be a U-boat which was the only time guns were fired at an enemy, real or imagined. NOYES Russell Kendall (I42092)
 
80419 WWII Army veteran 1LT NOYES Donald Charles (I92658)
 
80420 WWII Navy veteran. MITCHELL Glenn Vernon (I97337)
 
80421 WWII veteran. WILSON Myrle Clifton (I40852)
 
80422 Wyn Jonas says 11/4/1760 in Epping, NH. PIKE Elizabeth (I19429)
 
80423 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I52054)
 
80424 York Cemetery LAUGHTON Rebecca (I18816)
 
80425 York Cemetery LOVELAND Mary (I18802)
 
80426 York Cemetery LAUGHTON Rebecca (I27614)
 
80427 York Cemetery LOVELAND Mary (I27600)
 
80428 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Jason (I18815)
 
80429 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Herman B. (I18814)
 
80430 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Asa (I18801)
 
80431 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Jason (I27613)
 
80432 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Herman B. (I27612)
 
80433 York Cemetery. RUSSELL Asa (I27599)
 
80434 York mariner in 1685 Samuel Crawley stole money from his vessel bound for Boston, and Arthur Beale accused Jasper Pulman's wife of kissing him. Town grant 1685-1699, witness with John Penwill in 1687 and m. his dau. Hannah. Grand jury 1691, 1695; selectman 1696.

Administrator of Maj. John Davis' estate 1694, John Harmon bondsman. Admistration on own esttate grranted 7 Jan. 1700-1 to wid. Hannah, her bonds. Abraham Preble, Esq. and Johnson Harmon. As widow and administratix in 1705, she sold Cape Neddick land that was granted to Capt. Davis; living 6 Dec. 1723 and apparently a year later. The writ in suit Weare v. Milbury, 1743, names the children: Joseph, eldest son and plaintiff, of age 20
June 1710 when he deeded 1/4 acre where Major Davis' warehouse stood. Town grant 1721 (partly grant to John Davis, his grandfather), 1722. In 1731 he said 'my honored
grandfather John Davis, Esq.' Age approximately 66 in July 1752. 
WEARE Joseph (I17818)
 
80435 York mariner in 1685 Samuel Crawley stole money from his vessel bound for Boston, and Arthur Beale accused Jasper Pulman's wife of kissing him. Town grant 1685-1699, witness with John Penwill in 1687 and m. his dau. Hannah. Grand jury 1691, 1695; selectman 1696.

Administrator of Maj. John Davis' estate 1694, John Harmon bondsman. Admistration on own esttate grranted 7 Jan. 1700-1 to wid. Hannah, her bonds. Abraham Preble, Esq. and Johnson Harmon. As widow and administratix in 1705, she sold Cape Neddick land that was granted to Capt. Davis; living 6 Dec. 1723 and apparently a year later. The writ in suit Weare v. Milbury, 1743, names the children: Joseph, eldest son and plaintiff, of age 20
June 1710 when he deeded 1/4 acre where Major Davis' warehouse stood. Town grant 1721 (partly grant to John Davis, his grandfather), 1722. In 1731 he said 'my honored
grandfather John Davis, Esq.' Age approximately 66 in July 1752. 
WEARE Joseph (I52021)
 
80436 York, tailoress, single 21 Jan 1741-2 when she quit claimed father's and mother's estates to James Donnell. WEBBER Mary (I19179)
 
80437 York, tailoress, single 21 Jan 1741-2 when she quit claimed father's and mother's estates to James Donnell. WEBBER Mary (I52092)
 
80438 Younger brother of Senusret II and a prince of Egypt, He never attained the thrown of Egypt. AMENEMHETANKH (I5332)
 
80439 Younger son of Demetrius Soter (Surnamed Sidetes after Sida in Pamphylia, where he was educated) and brother of Demetrius Nicator, whose wife, Cleopatra, he married when Demetrius was taken prisoner by the Parthians. Antiochus overthrew the usurper, Tryphon, and ascended the throne himself and reigned from 139 to 130 BC. He defeated John Maccabeus and besieged Jerusalem (Ant., XIII, viii, 2), but concluded a favorable peace (Ant., XIII, viii, 3) from fear of Rome. Later he waged war with the Parthians and was slain in battle (1 Macc 15:2-9, 28-31). ANTIOCHUS, VII (I4610)
 
80440 Youngest daughter of Amenhotep III and Tiy. BEKET-ATEN (I5107)
 
80441 Youngest son, had (mortgage) land and livestock in 1726. WEBBER Joseph (I19168)
 
80442 Youngest son, had (mortgage) land and livestock in 1726. WEBBER Joseph (I52076)
 
80443 Yuya and his wife, Tuya, who owned vast holdings in the Delta, was the father of Tiy, wife of Amenhotep III. Yuya was also a powerful military leader. Their tomb, numbered KV46 in the Valley of the Kings, is well known. YUYA (I5108)
 
80444 Zachariah and Hannah lived in Dunstable and Bedford, New Hampshire and Jay, Maine.

The record shows Zac Pike's name on a muster roll for the Minute Men of Dunstable, along with Joseph and Isaac Pike, two of Zachariah Pike's cousins. 
PIKE Zachariah (I43113)
 
80445 Zachariah and Hannah lived in Dunstable and Bedford, New Hampshire and Jay, Maine. PIKE Zachariah (I35093)
 
80446 Zachariah Kempton came to Harbor Island from Hampden, Maine in 1821 and stayed about four years. He, together with his brother, who came at the same time, built a house and store on Harbor Island, and did considerable trading. They bought and cured fish and fitted out vessels. He soon brought his family here. His wife was Mary Evans and they were the parents of five children -- Frank, David, Zachariah, William, and Jane. In 1898 they were all dead except Zachariah, Jr. and William. Mr. Kempton was a carpenter; he learned his trade of his father, who was a shipbuilder and one of the pioneer settlers of Frankfort. This Kempton family came to Frankfort from Plymouth, Mass., where they settled when they came from England. No member of this family is now living in New England (1898) except a niece of Zachariah; she is the wife of Alfred H. Slatten, of Hampden Corner, Maine. KEMPTON Zacheus (I53913)
 
80447 Zachariah Taylor Noyes, the leading business factor of Mondamin, came to Harrison County in 1856 with his parents, Capt. and Mrs. John Noyes. His father, John Noyes, and his mother, Mary (Starks) Noyes, were prominent in the early settlement of the county, and are made the subject of a personal sketch elsewhere in this volume. The father died in 1855; the mother still survives and is living at Mondamin, at the advanced age of seventy-three years. The Noyes family are of English extraction and emigrated from Maine to Ohio at a very early date.

Zachariah Taylor, of whom we write, was but a small boy when Capt. Noyes came with his family to Harrison County. His education and early training have all been within this county. His success as a business man and citizen speaks well for the family with which he is associated; also of the type of manhood produced by pioneering on the frontier of Western Iowa.

When our subject was a mere stripling of a boy he worked in and around his father's steam sawmill and upon the farm. He soon exhibited good executive and business ability, and in 1872 he began mercantile life in Mondamin, in company with his father, who was an extensive dealer in general merchandise and a grain shipper. Upon the death of his father he took charge of the whole business. His present store is a double-room building - well arranged for the conducting of the large amount of business he now transacts. He is a first-class, modern business man, possessed of those manly and business-like methods that ever win friends, and is almost certain to insure success amoung men in business callings. No man stands higher in the estimation of his neighbors and also among commercial circles than he of whom we pen this notice. Like his father, Capt. John Noyes, he is a strong man, in almost any sense this term may be rightfully applied.

To measure a man's worth in a community we must needs sound the opinion of those with whom he has lived and labored for a term of years. In the vicinity of Mondamin, where Mr. Noyes has grown to mature years, the universal opinion is that he possesses great merit as a business man, as well as abiding friendship and candor as a citizen and neighbor.

Our subject's father's family settled just northwest of where Mondamin stands on section 20, of Morgan Township. The father had been twice married and was the father of thirteen children, of whom Z.T. was the ninth child. Of the eight children who still live, six reside in Harrison County: Etta, Mrs. Bryan; Maria, Mrs. Doolittle; John H.; Fillmore; G.W. Jr., and our subject.

Jane Pyle, daughter of Hayes and Nancy Pyle, of the Buckeye State, became Mr. Noyes' wife, September 9, 1873. Four children have come to bless their home-circle, three of whom still survive: the second born died when eighteen months of age. Ray, born February 10, 1876; Neddie, July 14, 1877, now deceased; Bessie, September 28, 1880, and Helen July 3, 1888.

In his home circle, Mr. Noyes takes much delight and is never so happy, as when surrounded by his interesting family, within the sacred place called home.

Politically, he believes in and supports by voice and ballot, the general principles of the Republican party. He is an honored member of Mondamin Lodge, No. 392, of the I.O.O.F. Mrs. Noyes is a consistent christian and identified with the Congregational church.

There are but few men who have not yet passed the prime of their manhood, who have achieved the almost enviable business and social reputation enjoyed by Mr. Noyes. Parentage and nature first gifted him with many talents and the school of everyday experience has molded him into a man of eminence, of whom the world has none too many. The estimate thus placed upon him is but the universal opinion of his wide circle of admirers. 
NOYES Zachariah "Taylor" (I7998)
 
80448 Zadoc Whitcomb was selectman and town treasurer of North Yarmouth. WHITCOMB Zadoc (I12464)
 
80449 Zebulon was a corporal in the Revolutionary War. CHESEBROUGH Zebulon (I47523)
 
80450 Zechariah Loring, according to his father's will, learned the trade of a "smith"; was called "weaver" in some documents, "barber" in others. He lived in the town of Hingham until well along in life, when he sold his Hingham property (the latest deed was in 1795) and removed to Perry, Me., by the side of the St. Croix River, where it empties into Passamaquoddy Bay. LORING Zachariah (I34669)
 

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