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51

He sold his place in Kingston in 1728, and removed to North Yarmouth, Me. : he was one of the founders of the First Church in 170 : elected Deacon in 1737. 
Dea. MITCHELL Jacob (I44403)
 
52

He was a lieutenant in Col. Samuel Waldo, Jr.’s regiment in 1764, enlisted, April 24, 1775, as major in Col. Edmund Phinney’s 31st Regiment of Foot, in the 18th Continental regiment in 1776, and in this regiment in 1779. 
Major BROWN Jacob (I56103)
 
53

He was a master of numerous vessels. 
Capt. DRINKWATER Allen (I41769)
 
54

He was a shareholder in Boscawen, N. H., and on the committee to lay out the lands. His trade was that of a feltmaker. He sold his interest in Rolfe's lane, from the green to Merrimac river, to the town of Newbury Dec. 24, 1735. Bought land of Richard Brown May 3, 1717. He signed a petition of certain inhabitants May 24, 1770, for liberty to attend religious service where they desired and pay where they attended.

A letter of his is extant, which is here presented:

Newbury ye 3d, 1774.
Son & Daughter, I remember my love to you and your children and hope that these few lines will find you all in good health. Through the goodness of God I am able to go abroad. Blessed be God for it. Sara and David remember their love to brother & sister & children. Daniel I am obliged to you and your wife for sending so many good things to me. Daniel I think you have not me forgotten. Sara has sent three forks, two for you and one for Benjamin. I have put aboard Timothy Noyes a bushel of rye and flax & Sara has sent a little oat meal. So no more at present but I remain your loving father Benjamin Pettingell. Daniel money dont make marridg but virtue and good carridg. 
PETTINGELL Benjamin (I8125)
 
55

He was a shareholder in Boscawen, N. H., and on the committee to lay out the lands. His trade was that of a feltmaker. He sold his interest in Rolfe's lane, from the green to Merrimac river, to the town of Newbury Dec. 24, 1735. Bought land of Richard Brown May 3, 1717. He signed a petition of certain inhabitants May 24, 1770, for liberty to attend religious service where they desired and pay where they attended.

A letter of his is extant, which is here presented:

Newbury ye 3d, 1774.
Son & Daughter, I remember my love to you and your children and hope that these few lines will find you all in good health. Through the goodness of God I am able to go abroad. Blessed be God for it. Sara and David remember their love to brother & sister & children. Daniel I am obliged to you and your wife for sending so many good things to me. Daniel I think you have not me forgotten. Sara has sent three forks, two for you and one for Benjamin. I have put aboard Timothy Noyes a bushel of rye and flax & Sara has sent a little oat meal. So no more at present but I remain your loving father Benjamin Pettingell. Daniel money dont make marridg but virtue and good carridg. 
PETTINGELL Benjamin (I2229)
 
56

He was second in command at the fort at Casco. 
Capt. LARRABEE Benjamin (I11545)
 
57

In 1790, James was enumerated in Falmouth with 1-0-4-0-0, living next door to his father and brother Stephen (USC, p.15b). 
RIGGS James (I11960)
 
58

In 1897 and 1899 he was a representative to the Maine legislature from Yarmouth. 
Capt. PRINCE Harlan Page, Sr. (I61181)
 
59

Individual: Noyes, Mabel
Birth date: May 19, 1879
Death date: Jun 1963
Social Security #: 014-10-4148
Last residence: MA
State of issue: MA 
NOYES Mabelle Chapman (I14097)
 
60

James was called mariner, shipwright and finally gentleman. As James Lunt of Newbury, shipwright, he bought his first Falmouth land from Danforth Phipps, two lots "on the neck," on August 30, 1743. In 1752 Ephraim Jones sold to him three acres on Mountjoy's Neck and also had from Ebenezer Gustin another lot. As gentleman, of Falmouth, he and his brother Benjamin, by separate deeds, bought adjoining lots "on the neck" from their brother-in-law Josiah Noyes in 1756. On December 15, 1761, he signed a division agreement with the heirs of Joseph Noyes in behalf of his children by his late wife Hannah. 
Capt. LUNT James, Jr. (I29511)
 
61

John Kent owned half of Kent's Island; the other half was given to his son by his great-uncle Richard, for whom he was named. There was a house on the island standing in a pear orchard at the south of an old barn owned by Joseph,5 then Paul,6 but John2 probably resided in the old homestead built in 1700, and still standing in 1830. He appears to have been a man of property, of energy, and good character. 
Sergt. KENT John (I25021)
 
62

Left two children. 
LORING Sarah Jane (I25230)
 
63

Lived in Newbury on the side of Turkey Hill. 
Serg. BROWNE Francis (I54911)
 
64

Lived on the homestead in North Yarmouth and had a family. 
LORING Jeremiah, Jr. (I4284)
 
65

Lived on the homestead in North Yarmouth and had a family. 
LORING Jeremiah, Jr. (I94303)
 
66

Living single 4 Mar 1677/8 [EPR 3:221]; probably she who married Newbury 7 April 1678 Joshua Boynton. 
BROWN Sarah (I54890)
 
67

Mentioned in his father's will. 
HAMMOND John (I15763)
 
68

Merrill Road was in the part of North Yarmouth which by successive town incorporations became Freeport in 1789 and Pownal in 1808. The road took its name from Josiah Merrill who was the first settler who improved land in that section. He had previously lived in the part of North Yarmouth which is now Cumberland. He bought his farm, consisting of fifty acres on the west side of Merrill Road, half a mile from the Freeport line, in 1788. He was unmarried, but at once set about clearing his land, and built a log house near the western edge of the property. In 1790 he married Eunice Merrill of Falmouth, Maine. The log house was their home for fifteen years, and there six of their children were born. But Josiah Merrill had built at the wrong end of his farm. The highway bounded his farm on the east, and in 1805 he built a large one-story frame house on Merrill Road, and thither removed his family. He was a quiet substantial citizen, and his wife was an industrious woman, of high standing in the church and the community. In later years, his son Daniel managed the farm. Josiah Merrill's children were all singers. A writer in "old Times in North Yarmouth" relates that it was no unusual thing, about 1835, "to see the family of nine children seated in the singing-gallery, with the oldest son the leader and the youngest son as the performer on the bass-viol. Four of these children sat in the church choir for more than half a century.

Merrill Road was in the part of North Yarmouth which by successive town incorporations became Freeport in 1789 and Pownal in 1808. The road took its name from Josiah Merrill who was the first settler who improved land in that section. He had previously lived in the part of North Yarmouth which is now Cumberland. He bought his farm, consisting of fifty acres on the west side of Merrill Road, half a mile from the Freeport line, in 1788 for £40. He was unmarried, but at once set about clearing his land, and built a log house near the western edge of the property. In 1790 he married Eunice Merrill of Falmouth, Maine. The log house was their home for fifteen years, and there six of their children were born. But Josiah Merrill had built at the wrong end of his farm. The highway bounded his farm on the east, and in 1805 he built a large one-story frame house on Merrill Road, and thither removed his family. He was a quiet substantial citizen, and his wife was an industrious woman, of high standing in the church and the community. In later years, his son Daniel managed the farm. Josiah Merrill's children were all singers. A writer in "old Times in North Yarmouth" relates that it was no unusual thing, about 1835, "to see the family of nine children seated in the singing-gallery, with the oldest son the leader and the youngest son as the performer on the bass-viol. Four of these children sat in the church choir for more than half a century.

Merrill Road was in the part of North Yarmouth which by successive town incorporations became Freeport in 1789 and Pownal in 1808. The road took its name from Josiah Merrill who was the first settler who improved land in that section. He had previously lived in the part of North Yarmouth which is now Cumberland. He bought his farm, consisting of fifty acres on the west side of Merrill Road, half a mile from the Freeport line, in 1788 for £40. He was unmarried, but at once set about clearing his land, and built a log house near the western edge of the property. In 1790 he married Eunice Merrill of Falmouth, Maine. The log house was their home for fifteen years, and there six of their children were born. But Josiah Merrill had built at the wrong end of his farm. The highway bounded his farm on the east, and in 1805 he built a large one-story frame house on Merrill Road, and thither removed his family. He was a quiet substantial citizen, and his wife was an industrious woman, of high standing in the church and the community. In later years, his son Daniel managed the farm. Josiah Merrill's children were all singers. A writer in "old Times in North Yarmouth" relates that it was no unusual thing, about 1835, "to see the family of nine children seated in the singing-gallery, with the oldest son the leader and the youngest son as the performer on the bass-viol. Four of these children sat in the church choir for more than half a century. 
MERRILL Josiah (I33146)
 
69

Moved west and had a family. 
LORING Susannah (I6649)
 
70

Moved west and had a family. 
LORING Susannah (I94311)
 
71

Mr. Jones was a skilled carver of figure-heads in the old days when wooden ships were built in Maine. 
JONES Emery (I36423)
 
72

Not listed in 1850 census. 
NOYES Alpheus Elvin (I20556)
 
73

Noyes, Samuel, Jr., Falmouth. Capt. Samuel Noyes's co., Col. Edmund Phinnie's (31st) regt.; billeting allowed from dated of enlistment, May 18 (also given May 15), 1775, to date of marching from Falmouth, July 13, 1775; credited with 8 weeks allowance; also, company return [probably Oct., 1775], dated Fort No. 2, Cambridge; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Fort No. 2, Cambridge, Oct. 27, 1775. [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:556]


Noyes, Samuel. Treasury pay roll of Maj. Thomas Thomas's (Artillery) co. for service on expedition to Rhode Island in 1778. [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:556] 
NOYES Samuel, Jr. (I6813)
 
74

On 14 July 1826, six days before he died, he deeded his home place to his third son, Anderson ... for $100, the love and affection I bear to my son, Anderson of Freeport, yeoman, land in Freeport, 57 acres more or less, bounded on the W. by little river, on the N.E. by land owned by Jeremiah Coffin, being the whole of the homestead on which I now live. [Cumberland Co. Deeds 106:364.] 
BREWER Edward (I19924)
 
75

On Jan. 26, 1774, Huldah Mitchell, for œ62, conveyed to Edward6 Small, of North Yarmouth, fifty acres of land, "it being the Northwestern half Part of the one hundred acre lot numbered fifteen in Range A. lying on the Northeasterly Side of Royalls River in said Town." This was her husband's farm, which he, "Stephen Mitchell of Northyarmouth, Cordwainer," had purchased of Francis Wyman, formerly of that town, but then a resident of Georgetown, Lincoln County, Maine, on October 14, 1768, for œ100; with the stipulation that he should pay "at the End of the first year from the Date herof, Twenty pounds, and the Remaining Eighty Pounds at the End of three years from the Date herof with lawfull interest." After the death of her husband, "widow Huldah Mitchell" paid, on November 11, 1773, to Francis Wyman, the sum of œ26:15, and received a deed of the premises which she conveyed, two months later, to Edward Small.

In the fall of 1777, "widow Huldah Mitchell took up a government loan for œ15."?? An old paper which has escaped the destroyer shows that Asa6 Lewis receipted to Huldah Mitchell for œ15 lawful money, which his father, John Lewis, was to take to the Provincial treasurer; and "Mr. Asa Lewis" bound himself to return to her a government note for that amount or to restore to her the money. This was in the darkest period of the Revolutionary War, and the memory of that noble and patriotic act has long survived her. 
MOULTON Huldah (I26931)
 
76

One of the 60 original proprietors of New Gloucester (Maine). 
Capt. EVELETH Isaac, Jr. (I10506)
 
77

Perkins Eveleth came to New Gloucester where he was a subscriber for the Meeting House in 1770. He died in his 34th year, leaving one son, Samuel, who lived in Lisbon, Maine. 
EVELETH Perkins (I10178)
 
78

Private soldier in the Revolutionary War. 
FOGG Benaiah (I23596)
 
79

Removed to Nantucket, and is supposed to be the ancestor of all the inhabitants of the island of this name. He was in Amesbury April, 1665. 
BARNARD Nathaniel (I278)
 
80

Removed to Nantucket, and is supposed to be the ancestor of all the inhabitants of the island of this name. He was in Amesbury April, 1665. 
BARNARD Nathaniel (I5759)
 
81

Removed to Nantucket, and is supposed to be the ancestor of all the inhabitants of the island of this name. He was in Amesbury April, 1665. 
BARNARD Nathaniel (I46293)
 
82

Served as a private and matross in the Massachusetts line. His widow received a pension for over fifteen months' actual service of her husband.
 
BRADBURY Samuel G. (I12501)
 
83

Served in the American Revolution on the ship "PALLAS" on the Penobscot Expedition (MS&S 15 : 212). He lived in Washington County, Maine on land he sold in 1788 after he returned to No. Yarmouth (Wash Co Deeds 1 : 152). He may have had three sons. 
STUBBS Moses (I7033)
 
84

Served in the Revolutionary War. Private in Capt. George Roger's Co. Reg. by order of Col. Jonathan Mitchell to work on the fortifications at Falmouth. 
BREWER Daniel (I19910)
 
85

She was a widow in 1683 when she appointed her cousin Richard Hubbard (husband of her cousin Martha Allen) her attorney to care for her interests in the estates of her father and mother. 
GOODALE Mary (I20040)
 
86

She was admitted to Rowley Church before her marriage, Mar 29 1669. Adm. on her estate granted May 14 1696 to her only child living, Elizabeth KIMBALL. Her birth date given as 12 m 4 da 1641. 
STICKNEY Faith (I1790)
 
87

She was admitted to Rowley Church before her marriage, Mar 29 1669. Adm. on her estate granted May 14 1696 to her only child living, Elizabeth KIMBALL. Her birth date given as 12 m 4 da 1641. 
STICKNEY Faith (I39571)
 
88

She was dismissed from the church in Barnstable to the church in Middleboro. From there the family removed to Portland, Maine. 
Deac. COBB Jonathan (I1638)
 
89

She was from a wealthy family, brought up in affluence; and as a part of her marriage-portion, received "Billinder", a young colored woman, for her household servant. She served her mistress faithfully, survived her and her husband, and was supported in her old age by their heirs, according to the provisions of Mr. Loring's will. Mrs. Loring was precise in dress, dignified in deportment, and by her good sense embalmed the name of "Madame Loring" in the memory of that people. 
RICHMOND Mary (I46624)
 
90

Son of Baronet Henry Cobb of England. Henry came on the ship Anna in 1629. He was a leader in the Barnstable community from 1645 to 1679.
He was a useful and valuable man, often deputy to the court, and other public employments. 
Elder COBB Henry (I1775)
 
91

Superintendent of Pan Handle Railroad shops, Portland, Maine. 
DERR Augustus S. (I31079)
 
92

The "Greely Road" was named for Mr. Greely. There is no building on the place where Mr. and Mrs. Greely lived to old age and raised their children. They died in the house of their son Jonathan. 
GREELY Eliphalet, Sr. (I41476)
 
93

Twin of Ann Stevens. 
STUBBS Mercy Brown (I36945)
 
94

Twin of Mercy Brown. 
STUBBS Anna Stevens (I34614)
 
95

Unmarried. 
MASON Sarah (I15665)
 
96

Unmarried. 
KELLY Anna (I72034)
 
97

Veteran of the War of 1812. 
OSGOOD Silas (I62052)
 
98

William T. Gooding was a T/Sgt in WWI. 
GOODING William Thaxter (I69462)
 
99

Zechariah Loring, according to his father's will, learned the trade of a "smith"; was called "weaver" in some documents, "barber" in others. He lived in the town of Hingham until well along in life, when he sold his Hingham property (the latest deed was in 1795) and removed to Perry, Me., by the side of the St. Croix River, where it empties into Passamaquoddy Bay. 
LORING Zachariah (I67354)
 
100
 
MORRIS Eunice (I116445)
 

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