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151
He joined his father in the family stonecutting business sometime in 1809 or before (perhaps after he turned twenty-one in 1803), probably replacing his brother Enoch. After father, Paul Noyes, died, Robert continued for a time (he is mentioned as a "stone cutter" in two property transactions in 1811 and 1812), but ultimately also gave up stonecutting about 1815, judging from his gravestone production.

He later went to Maine, studied at Bowdoin College, became a minister and spent two years preaching to the congregation in Limington, Maine from 1821 to 1823. After his parishioners declined to retain him, he relocated sometime before 1836 to New Gloucester, Maine where both he and his wife died.

Robert's closure of his family's stonecutting shop was no doubt influenced by the fact that other, more competent stonecutters had established their own shops in the town, including Shubael Treat, Ebenezer Soule III, Moses Warren and Eliphalet Dame.
 
Rev. NOYES Robert Heath (I20968)
 
152
He was confused in the "Genealogical Record of Some of The Noyes Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes." Vol. I with Enoch, son of Samuel who died 30 Jan 1811. This Enoch died in 1832 at the age of 58 and his wife, Margaret administered his estate.

Enoch Noyes (1773 - 1832), son of stone engraver and carver Paul Noyes of Newburyport, produced tree and urn stones similar to those of his father and others. This type of stone is so standardized that it can only be attributed to a given carver when signed or probated.

While Enoch Noyes took over the lion's share of the gravestone production of the Noyes shop from about 1796, he also throughout this period and beyond ran a paint shop. He first advertised this shop in the "Newburyport Herald" in 1798. A similar advertisement appeared in 1799 and a later version in 1806. Enoch offered not only paint, but also "Sign, Chaise, and other Painting, Gilding and Varnishing." In the first two ads, his shop was "in Merrimack Street, just below Green street," while in the thirs ad, it was "in Union Street."

In 1807, he bought a house on Strong Street for $693 from Joshua and Elizabeth Carter.

In 1809, he appears to have yielded his role in the stonecutting shop to his younger brother Robert (who was twenty seven that year), for a notice in the "Newburyport Herald" in May of that year by Paul and Robert Noyes informed the public that a "new arrangement" had been made in their stonecutting business.

The situation changed again, of course, with the death of Paul Noyes in October of 1810. Enoch was appointed administrator in early November, but a few days before, he also placed a notice in the "Herald" advertising the sale of a house on Summer Street (which his father had bought three years earlier), two pews in the Meeting House, an assortment of Connecticut freestone and a "Shop-chamber in Union-street, suitable for a Cabinet-maker, or joiner." At the end of this ad, there is the notice: "N.B. Stone Cutting business carried on as usual by R.H. NOYES at the place lately occupied by his father." The house on Summer St. was sold in January of 1811 [Essex Co. Deeds: 193:185].

In October of 1811, Enoch sold his "share of my late father's estate" to his sister Sarah for $600 [196:26]. Yet in December of 1812, to cover a note for about $500, he and his siblings mortgaged the Noyes homestead to a Dorcas Noyes (who was probably their uncle Silas's widow). Had he mortgaged his share to his sister and then reaquired it?

In November of 1811, Enoch advertised a home for sale on Strong Street, "newly built" (as well as the two pews in the Meeting House). (Was this the same house he bought in 1808, or had he built a new one?) Enoch was apparently unable to sell this house, for in a notice in July of 1815, it was to be auctioned off. At the time he was still in debt for $365 on his house (Samuel Newman then held the mortgage, taken out in August of 1811; [194:237], as well as for an additional $123 on a mortgage on the same house held by a Paul Noyes of Salisbury, NH (not his father) originally taken out in October of 1811 [196:17], but re-mortgaged [?] to the same man 1812 [198:117]. It was perhaps David Patch who bought these two mortgages in the auction, for in December of 1815, Patch paid Enoch $1,250 for this property [208:259].

It appears that, after his father's death, Enoch had restructured his assets, as it were, buying and selling these properties (no doubt used as collateral for personal loans as well). In all these property transactions (one in 1807, two in 1811, three in 1812 and one in 1815), Enoch's occupation is "painter." In addition to his 1798, 1799 and 1806 advertisements for his paint shop, Enoch also put a notice in the "Herald" in March, 1811 about his runaway apprentice "to the painter's trade" Robert Griffith. The probate records for Enoch in 1832 and for his father in 1810 and 1813 all list Enoch as a painter as well.


 
NOYES Enoch (I72540)
 
153 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I86147)
 
154 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I685)
 
155 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I83655)
 
156 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I479)
 
157
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHig92GwXbY 
SENA Agostino (I417)
 
158
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHig92GwXbY 
SENA Agostino (I81326)
 
159
In Boscawen he was selectman for some years, and held the office of deacon in the church.

He lived on East Mountain.

Credited with service in the Revolution from Concord, N.H.: Co. Cdr. Joshua Abbott, Regt. Cdr. Lt. Col. Gerrish.


 
Deacon NOYES Cutting (I11924)
 
160
Increase died on the way back from the expedition to Canada, 1690.
Their vessel was discovered, burried in the sand, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Anse Auz Bouleaux, on Dec. 24, 1994, and later identified as part of Capt. William Phips' fleet.

Two of the artifacts recovered from the shipwreck helped identify it. The first was a musket, bearing the initials "CT" on a small lead plaque. The other object, a pewter porringer, showed on it's handle, three letters positioned in a triangle: M,I and S. The position of the letters showed the owner's initials were "IM", and his wife's were "SM". Only three could match these initials.

It happened that the last two Cornelius Tileston for the "CT" and Increase Moseley, were part of the same company, the company of Dorchester, Ma., of which most of the men had disappeared without a trace with their ship. What is more, Increase Mosley's wife was named Sarah, which conforms to the initials on the porringer.

National Geographic
Barbara's Maudsley and Moseley's family research.
 
MOSELEY Increase (I113875)
 
161
Job K. Pike continued the diary that his father, John Thurston Pike had written. (1992: Caribou Historical Society). Job migrated to northern Maine in 1879 and settled on a farm on the Caribou-Presque Isle Road in the Mayesville area. In later years the family moved into the Village of Caribou and resided on Pleasant and Fenderson Streets. In later years the farm was owned by H.T. Fletcher. Job became a well known cabinet maker. In his diaries he often refers to visiting Number 13 (unidentified at the time of this writing). Before the towns were given a name they were often referred to by number or letter; i.e. Caribou was originally called "Letter H" later "Lyndon" and in about 1877 it became "Caribou."

It is interesting to note that in Job's diary he often refers to the Rideout Family. Ellen Rideout (b. 3 Feb 1842) was often a guest at Job's home. Her brother, Lt. James E. Rideout, (b. ca. 1838) is also mentioned. Their sister, Caroline M. Rideout (b. 11 Nov 1844) married Hiram Pike, Jr. on 6 Sep 1862.

Aroostook Republican, 13 March 1924, p. 13.
"J.K. Pike's entire lot of carpenter tools and machines will be on sale at his home on Fenderson Street all day Wednesday, March 19th."
 
PIKE Job Knight (I52648)
 
162
Lived several years in Topsfield on Farrow Lake managing "Briggs Fur Farm".
 
NOYES Hazel Ella (I8340)
 
163
Name: Isaac T. Haskell
Side: Union
Regiment State/Origin: Massachusetts
Regiment Name: 22 Massachusetts Infantry.
Regiment Name Expanded: 22nd Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry Company: D
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Sergeant
Rank Out Expanded: Sergeant
Film Number: M544 roll 18

Name: Isaac T. Haskell
Side: Union
Regiment State/Origin: Massachusetts
Regiment Name: 22 Massachusetts Infantry
Regiment Name Expanded: 22nd Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry Company: D
Rank In: Private
Rank In Expanded: Private
Rank Out: Sergeant
Rank Out Expanded: Sergeant
Film Number: M544 roll 18
[U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line].]


Name: Isaac Haskell
Residence: East Boston, Massachusetts
Occupation: Carpenter
Enlistment Date: 6 Sep 1861
Side Served: Union
State Served: Massachusetts
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 6 September 1861 at the age of 35.
Enlisted in Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Massachusetts on 6 Sep 1861.
Promoted to Full Corporal on 13 Oct 1862.
Promoted to Full Sergeant on 1 Feb 1863.
Transferred into Company L, 32nd Infantry Regiment Massachusetts on 21 Oct 1864.
Transferred out of Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Massachusetts on 21 Oct 1864.
Mustered Out Company L, 32nd Infantry Regiment Massachusetts on 29 Jun 1865.
[American Civil War Soldiers [database on-line].] 
HASKELL Isaac T. (I34627)
 
164
Noyes, Paul, Newburyport. Private, Capt. Moses Nowell's co., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 4 days. [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:556]

Served on the "Alliance" in the revolutionary war and was on a list of prisoners taken in the Brigantine "Dolton" [sic "Dalton"] and committed to Mill Prison, Plymouth, England, June, 1777; Benjamin Franklin negotiated an exchange of prisoners, March 1779. By February 1780, the King of Denmark paid their ransom. The released prisoners met with Franklin at his residence outside Paris and sailed for home on the "Alliance", a new frigate constructed to protect American commerce. A letter dated March 10, 1781, sent to Paul Noyes at St. Lucia from his brother Silas explained Silas was having trouble arranging for a ship to come to the island to get him. Apparently, this leg of the passage home had to be financed privately. At the time of the letter, Paul Noyes would have been away four years and four months.

Paul Noyes (1741-1810) of Newburyport, MA., produced a number of stones starting shortly after the revolution, using the urban style of a winged face (or cherub). He was the successor to Robert Fowle who returned to Boston after serving as Newburyport's resident gravestone carver from 1773 to 1778. He varied his stones by having his inexpensive stones engraved rather than carved, the fancier stones having three dimensional heads. He also produced some stones with a cameo effect when the stone allowed. His borders are varied, but one of his favorites is borrowed from the Boston carver Geyer. On double stones he often produced a three lobed top containing two cherubs with the middle lobe containing an hourglass. Later he made tree and urn stones, and occasionally an atypical design (such as one containing a quadrant made for a navigation teacher). His lettering is good with frequent use of italics. His stones can be found in coastal towns from Maine to Georgia, as well as in the Merrimac valley. His first probate payment for gravestone is dated 1791 (when he was fifty) and his only signed stone (for his father) is dated 1787. No body of gravestone work has been found that could be reasonably attributed to Paul Noyes before this time. Prior to 1787 he was known as a "carver" which, in early New England, routinely designated "wood-carver", not "stone-carver." He probably kept his hand in the wood-carving trade well into the period in which he was actively carving gravestone.

Paul Noyes and his father were among those who signed the petition to incorporate Newburyport as a separate entity in 1762.

Dr. Francis Vergnies de Bouischere was a French physician who came from Guadaloupe to reside in the home of Paul Noyes in 1796 from which he offered his services. He continued to reside in the Noyes home until his death, 20 years after Noyes' death.
 
NOYES Paul (I20926)
 
165
She was the fourth and last child of Capt. Thomas W. and Bessie M. (Loring) Harris and traced her ancestors to Fred Loring (b. 1780) and Rhodia Moody (b. 1786.)
 
HARRIS Lillian Cammette (I52650)
 
166
She was tried for witchcraft at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and acquitted 1 February 1693. Her son Samuel was appointed administrator of her estate, 25 May 1741.
 
ALSBEE Sarah (I117471)
 
167
Styled Capt. Age at death 42 (Gravestone). Served as private at Crown Point 1755; in 2nd Foot Co of Newbury 1757; in Co of Militia 1757; at Castle William 1758; as private for the reduction of Canada 1759.
 
Capt. STICKNEY David (I77573)
 
168
Their children were Nelly J, Eva M, Georgie, Freddie, and Charles Henry. Nelly was the only one born in VT. The others were all born at Hart's Location, NH.

They lived and worked at Dr Bemis's property in Hart's Location, which they inherited when Dr Bemis died in 1881. In the 1900 census they were in Portland, ME on June 5th, then on June 23rd they were in the 1900 census at Hart's Location, NH. In the ME census divorced daughter, Nellie Percival, and granddaughter Harriet, were living with them. In the Hart's Location census only Harriet Percival was with them. Nellie shows up again when she remarried in 1901, but Harriet continued to live with Mary through 1920, even after she married and had children. After that Mary disappears and Harriet's family moves to NY by 1930, so Mary probably died 1920-1930. Mary had continued to live in Portland after husband, George, died in 1902.

Her stone is here with her husband's and her two infant sons, but there are no dates on her stone and her name wasn't added to Dr Bemis's stone like George's was.

[Shirley Mitchell - Find A Grave]
 
NOYES Mary Philinda (I14528)
 
169
William was born in West Gwillimbury, Ontario, Canada. He married Cynthia Reynolds (1835-1915) and they had two children, Julia West, born 1856 in Wisconsin, and Ella, born in Nebraska. Cynthia later married William Hamilton (1818-1904) and I believe they are both buried at Ridge Cemetery as well, but I am not certain. [Kevin Thomas West]
 
WEST William (I116220)
 
170 A GREAT MUSICIAN
Bainbridge C. Noyes, the first of the name, was the youngest son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Spofford) Noyes, and was born Aug. 8, 1822. He came to Georgetown when a boy, and learned his art here. The writer well remembers his exercises on his favorite instruments mornings, noons, and evenings, in the old Phoenix Building, where he worked on shoes with his brothers, Hiram N. Alfred B., and Charles A. (Albert) Noyes. He died unmarried, May 5, 1845, at the early age of 22 years. His remains were among the first buried in Harmony cemetery. His grandfather on his mothers side was the celebrated architect and bridge builder, James Spofford, associated with Timothy Palmer in building the Haverhill Rocks and Chain bridges. His grandmother was Mary Tenney.

The following is the article that has had circulation in all the musical magazines and many newspapers:

A musical journal, in an article on celebrated instrumental performers, speaks of a remarkable trombonist, who, a generation ago, attracted great attention at a concert in Boston, but whose name the writer is unable to recall. The musician in question was Bainbridge Noyes of Salem, whose rendering of the most difficult and rapid music on the unweildy trombone was equal to that of Ned Kendall on the Kent bugle, or Arbuckle on the cornet. His favorite piece was 'Fisher's Hornpipe,' with unlimited improvised variations. Once, while visiting New York State, he was strolling over a muster field, he came across a brass band 'at ease' on the ground, and half unconsciously he picked up a trombone and tooted the scale, just to test its tone, and laid it down again. The owner, thinking to astonish a tyro, and, perhaps also encourage him, by showing him to what excellence it was possible to attain, took up the instrument and played a popular march very creditably, he being more than an average performer, and looked to Noyes for signs of approval, who clapped his hands, exclaiming, 'Good! capital!' He then reached for the horn again and struck up 'Fisher's Hornpipe,' the members of the band staring in amazement, while the soldiers ran from all directions and gathered round the musician, whom they took for a veritable wizard. When he had finished the piece, with all the filling he could imagine, nobody cheered - they just looked at him, and when he handed back the trombone, the owner said in a surly tone, 'Keep the darned thing, I never'll blow it again.' - Georgetown Advocate.

He was leader of the Salem band. [Tenney genealogy]
 
NOYES Bainbridge Claflin (I4915)
 
171 A GREAT MUSICIAN
Bainbridge C. Noyes, the first of the name, was the youngest son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Spofford) Noyes, and was born in Milford, Mass., Aug. 8, 1822. He came to Georgetown when a boy, and learned his art here. The writer well remembers his exercises on his favorite instruments mornings, noons, and evenings, in the old Phoenix Building, where he worked on shoes with his brothers, Hiram N. Alfred B., and Charles A. (Albert) Noyes. He died unmarried, May 5, 1845, at the early age of 22 years. His remains were among the first buried in Harmony cemetery. His grandfather on his mothers side was the celebrated architect and bridge builder, James Spofford, associated with Timothy Palmer in building the Haverhill Rocks and Chain bridges. His grandmother was Mary Tenney.

The following is the article that has had circulation in all the musical magazines and many newspapers:

A musical journal, in an article on celebrated instrumental performers, speaks of a remarkable trombonist, who, a generation ago, attracted great attention at a concert in Boston, but whose name the writer is unable to recall. The musician in question was Bainbridge Noyes of Salem, whose rendering of the most difficult and rapid music on the unweildy trombone was equal to that of Ned Kendall on the Kent bugle, or Arbuckle on the cornet.. His favorite piece was 'Fisher's Hornpipe,' with unlimited improvised variations. Once, while visiting New York State, he was strolling over a muster field, he came across a brass band 'at ease' on the ground, and half unconsciously he picked up a trombone and tooted the scale, just to test its tone, and laid it down again. The owner, thinking to astonish a tyro, and, perhaps also encourage him, by showing him to what excellence it was possible to attain, took up the instrument and played a popular march very creditably, he being more than an average performer, and looked to Noyes for signs of approval, who clapped his hands, exclaiming, 'Good! capital!' He then reached for the horn again and struck up 'Fisher's Hornpipe,' the members of the band staring in amazement, while the soldiers ran from all directions and gathered round the musician, whom they took for a veritable wizard. When he had finished the piece, with all the filling he could imagine, nobody cheered - they just looked at him, and when he handed back the trombone, the owner said in a surly tone, 'Keep the darned thing, I never'll blow it again.' - Georgetown Advocate. 
NOYES Bainbridge Claflin (I27521)
 
172 Decendants of Rev. Wm. Noyes

The facts connected with the history of this family were left in manuscript by his son, Samuel B. Noyes, and were written between the years 1877 (when commenced) and 1883 (when last record was made).

The marriage date of John B. Noyes and Sarah Berry is not found, but she is positively identified from the fact that in his manuscript he speaks of going to Westerly, R.I. to visit his uncle, Saxton Berry. He also speaks at the same time of visiting his uncle, Nathan Noyes.

John B. Noyes and Sarah his wife are buried side by side in the grave-yard at Scott Corners, near the head of Skeneatles Lake. He removed from Rhode Island about December, 1802 and, with their children, Lydia, Samuel B. and Asenath, settled in the town of Brookfield, Madison County, New York, and lived in a log house during the winter of 1805. During 1806 he lived in a house that was built for a corn-house, narrower at the bottom than at the top. It was very small for a family to live in, but had to answer the purpose of a house. Clarinda was born in this house.

His next move was "over the swamp" in what later became Sandisfield, Oneida County. He had taken a small grist-mill to attend, on shares, in order to enable him to provide for his growing family, in that, then, new country. The mill was propelled by an "overshot wheel", twelve or fourteen feet in diameter. The water came from a small stream, near which the mill stood, and ran through a trough, elevated on a trestle, made of logs, laid up in a square at the bottom and gradually tapering toward the top.

Church was held in a barn, and the "district school" was two miles away.

He moved back to Brookfield, about three miles from the mill, and to a point a little south of what later was called North Brookfield, formerly called "Negro City". He lived, as tenant, in a house owned by Mr. Keth, for whom he worked. Lovina was born in this house. He lived there about one year, and then moved to another house one mile distant, where he lived one year and then moved to Pharsalia, Chenango County, twenty miles distant, and lived there two years. In the winter of 1811-12 he moved to Smyrna Hill, two and a half miles from Smyrna Village. This was about the timeof the commencement of the War of 1812. Times were extremely hard, provisions were both scarce and dear, and the amount of perseverance and self-sacrifice required in order to provide for a large family can hardly be realized.

In March, 1813, he put his household effects aboard a large sleigh, placed his family as comfortably as was possible, among his furniture and left Smyrna Hill for Cayuga County, New York. Two days from that time he arrives at the town of Sempronius (now Niles).

In the fall of 1813, he moved into a house almost a half mile north of Perryville. In the summer of 1815 he obtained the privilege of building a house on a small piece of land, owned by Daniel Raymond, and which land was cut off from his farm by a deep gully, containing three or four acres. As payment for putting up the house he was to have its use for four years. He lived in this house five years, and Leonard R. was born here. It was rather a romantic spot, surrounded by woods and not far from neighbors. He moved to Venice, New York about 1820 and later to Scott Corners, where he died as above stated.

The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says children born in Westerly, RI, Brookfield, and other towns in NY. 
NOYES John B. (I8658)
 
173 'Comb Industry In Newburyport'

Enoch Noyes in 1759 "commenced, without instruction, making horn buttons, and coarse combs, of various kinds." Noyes was soon to acquire a reputation as a "rabid Tory" that still lingers in his family; this political disposition perhaps made it easier for him to enter into a curious partnership that put new life into his business and helped establish West Newbury as a major comb making center.

One day in 1778, as Enoch Noyes sat working horn into combs with his hand tools, he was approached by a stranger, whose Anglicized name comes down to us as William Clelland, or Cleland. Clelland was a Hessian, one of the German mercenaries from the province of Hesse employed by the Crown to bolster regular British forces in the Revolution. According to Joshua Coffin, he was a deserter from Burgoyne's army, although later accounts refer to him as one of a group of prisoners taken either at Bennington or Saratoga, billeted in or near West Newbury, and given freedom to come and go as they pleased according to the informal practice of that place and time.

Clelland had been a comb maker in Germany, and in keeping with another practice of the era, he had come to New England with his tools. These were more advanced than those used by Enoch Noyes, and when the Hessian proposed that the two men work together, it must have struck the Yankee as an opportunity not only to increase production but also to learn what a modern manufacturer would call the "state of the art." Whatever advantages Clelland's European tools may have offered, it should be remembered that at this stage of the industry's development all phases of the comb making operation were accomplished by hand, from softening of the horn or tortoise shell in hot oil, to cutting and sawing teeth, to smoothing and polishing.

Because technology had not yet made comb making a capital-intensive enterprise requiring consolidation within larger factories (horse, water, and eventually steam power would be brought into use), the industry in the West Newbury of Enoch Noyes' day was still dispersed among a score or more of farmhouses.

Although there is no reliable information as to what eventually became of William Clelland, the name of Noyes remained prominent in the comb industry from the time of Enoch until well into the twentieth century.

'Reminiscences of A Nonagenarian'

Mr. Noyes, while a genius, was a great oddity. He would run half over the parish bareheaded and barefooted. It was no uncommon thing for him to appear at our house after dinner on a hot summer day, in only a shirt and breeches, having run across the fields two miles, "jest to take a nooning." A great joker and a capital story-teller, his appearance was the signal for a general frolic. He was more fond of telling strangers that his father used to say he had "four remarkable children: Molly was remarkably handsome, Tim was remarkably sloven, John was remarkably wicked, and Enoch was remarkably cunning."

'A County In Revolution'

"If Loyalists had opted for the popular side, life would have been so much easier. Of all the county Loyalists, possibly Enoch Noyes of Newbury, New Town was the most indiviualistic and colorful. The lanky, long-haired unkempt Noyes often was seen running barefoot, sometimes with a hatchet in hand. If Noyes were to be startled the cause of the disturbance could be the likely target of his hatchet. He had other peculiarities. On one instance, Noyes was seen armed with a crossbow shooting robins out of his cherry trees. On another occasion, it was reported that an unsuspecting acquaintance greeted Noyes with a loud "How do you do?" Noyes swung at his addressor and knocked him to the ground. While some considered Noyes erratic and strange, others saw a genius in him. An avid reader, Noyes could boast the largest library in town. He was among the first in the vicinity to raise fish and to import fruit trees. Free-thinker Noyes did not care what people thought of him or his political opinions. But he occasionally voiced his Tory views too loudly and had to retreat from popular threats against his safety. Noyes built a sub-cellar with an entrance from the chimney where he hid for long periods of time. Each day his wife would lower his food in a basket tied to a rope. Later in the War, Major Moses LIttle returned to his Turkey Hill Farm with 10 Hessian prisoners captured from Burgoyne's army at the Battle of Bennington. One of these prisoners was William Cleland. One day Cleland appeared with a knapsack of tools at the door of Enoch Noyes and offered his services as a skilled comb-maker. For nearly 20 years, Noyes had been making combs from horn and selling them in the Parish. Now he could apply the techniques of European manufacture. From this humble beginning, New Town became the birthplace of a thriving comb industry in the 19th century." 
NOYES Enoch (I16487)
 
174 'Comb Industry In Newburyport'

Enoch Noyes in 1759 "commenced, without instruction, making horn buttons, and coarse combs, of various kinds." Noyes was soon to acquire a reputation as a "rabid Tory" that still lingers in his family; this political disposition perhaps made it easier for him to enter into a curious partnership that put new life into his business and helped establish West Newbury as a major comb making center.

One day in 1778, as Enoch Noyes sat working horn into combs with his hand tools, he was approached by a stranger, whose Anglicized name comes down to us as William Clelland, or Cleland. Clelland was a Hessian, one of the German mercenaries from the province of Hesse employed by the Crown to bolster regular British forces in the Revolution. According to Joshua Coffin, he was a deserter from Burgoyne's army, although later accounts refer to him as one of a group of prisoners taken either at Bennington or Saratoga, billeted in or near West Newbury, and given freedom to come and go as they pleased according to the informal practice of that place and time.

Clelland had been a comb maker in Germany, and in keeping with another practice of the era, he had come to New England with his tools. These were more advanced than those used by Enoch Noyes, and when the Hessian proposed that the two men work together, it must have struck the Yankee as an opportunity not only to increase production but also to learn what a modern manufacturer would call the "state of the art." Whatever advantages Clelland's European tools may have offered, it should be remembered that at this stage of the industry's development all phases of the comb making operation were accomplished by hand, from softening of the horn or tortoise shell in hot oil, to cutting and sawing teeth, to smoothing and polishing.

Because technology had not yet made comb making a capital-intensive enterprise requiring consolidation within larger factories (horse, water, and eventually steam power would be brought into use), the industry in the West Newbury of Enoch Noyes' day was still dispersed among a score or more of farmhouses.

Although there is no reliable information as to what eventually became of William Clelland, the name of Noyes remained prominent in the comb industry from the time of Enoch until well into the twentieth century.

'Reminiscences of A Nonagenarian'

Mr. Noyes, while a genius, was a great oddity. He would run half over the parish bareheaded and barefooted. It was no uncommon thing for him to appear at our house after dinner on a hot summer day, in only a shirt and breeches, having run across the fields two miles, "jest to take a nooning." A great joker and a capital story-teller, his appearance was the signal for a general frolic. He was more fond of telling strangers that his father used to say he had "four remarkable children: Molly was remarkably handsome, Tim was remarkably sloven, John was remarkably wicked, and Enoch was remarkably cunning."

'A County In Revolution'

"If Loyalists had opted for the popular side, life would have been so much easier. Of all the county Loyalists, possibly Enoch Noyes of Newbury, New Town was the most indiviualistic and colorful. The lanky, long-haired unkempt Noyes often was seen running barefoot, sometimes with a hatchet in hand. If Noyes were to be startled the cause of the disturbance could be the likely target of his hatchet. He had other peculiarities. On one instance, Noyes was seen armed with a crossbow shooting robins out of his cherry trees. On another occasion, it was reported that an unsuspecting acquaintance greeted Noyes with a loud "How do you do?" Noyes swung at his addressor and knocked him to the ground. While some considered Noyes erratic and strange, others saw a genius in him. An avid reader, Noyes could boast the largest library in town. He was among the first in the vicinity to raise fish and to import fruit trees. Free-thinker Noyes did not care what people thought of him or his political opinions. But he occasionally voiced his Tory views too loudly and had to retreat from popular threats against his safety. Noyes built a sub-cellar with an entrance from the chimney where he hid for long periods of time. Each day his wife would lower his food in a basket tied to a rope. Later in the War, Major Moses LIttle returned to his Turkey Hill Farm with 10 Hessian prisoners captured from Burgoyne's army at the Battle of Bennington. One of these prisoners was William Cleland. One day Cleland appeared with a knapsack of tools at the door of Enoch Noyes and offered his services as a skilled comb-maker. For nearly 20 years, Noyes had been making combs from horn and selling them in the Parish. Now he could apply the techniques of European manufacture. From this humble beginning, New Town became the birthplace of a thriving comb industry in the 19th century." 
NOYES Enoch (I18423)
 
175 BLANCHE HAZEL (PIKE) MORGAN
1889-1964
by Dorothy Hazel (Morgan) Barnes
Blanche Hazel Pike was born 27 April 1889, the tenth child of Hiram Pike, Jr., and the fourth child by his second wife, Clara Alice (Merritt) Pike.
She was nicknamed "Bunch" and "Bunny" by her family and friends while growing up, although in my lifetime I only heard her called "Blanche". She grew to be 5'5" tall and must have been very slim at the time of her marriage since she had a waist measurement of twenty-one inches. By the time she reached her late forties she weighed approximately 170 pounds.
From hearing my mother, Blanche Pike Morgan reminisce through the years, I'm sure life was hard for the whole family from childhood. She told of winters when the snow sifted through cracks around the windows and onto the beds as they slept in the home on the Washburn Road (Noble Farm). She also told of how they carried water in pails from the Caribou Stream, some one hundred yards from the house, , to be heated on the cook stove in a "boiler" or tub for washing clothes, cooking baths and all other purposes. She told how they walked from that home to school in what is now the Sincock School--probably two and one-half to three miles, sometimes arriving with sodden clothes. She told of having to stand in the corner by the stove for being late for school and feeling so sick from the heat and the smell of wet clothes.
My heart always aches a little for a little girl of 13 years left with the responsibility of cooking and cleaning for a family. She told me of scrubbing bare pine floors until they came white and clean and how bad she always felt when "the boys would come in with muddy feet" getting them dirty again. She told us of her inexperienced cooking and of how her father coming home from his work tasted and seasoned the food, and of doing the family wash by hand.
Apparently theirs was always an industrious family, because Mother told of their digging dandelion greens, a spring delicacy in this area, and selling them from door to door to the townspeople. She always chuckled when she told us of how they would wash them well in the Caribou Stream, thus keeping them crisp and filling their containers which would have held more greans if they had wilted. They also picked wild berries and she told of asking her father to "make Jennie help pick" but that Jennie was the baby and wasn't required to help. When Uncle Charles Pike came to visit our home in 1937 after being gone for many years, he remarked upon that fact and said how unfair they had been in giving all their loving attention to the baby without appreciation for Blanche's heavy burden. Knowing her sweet and loving nature, I cannot believe that my Mother ever showed or even felt any jealousy over that fact although she surely must have been very discouraged at times.
I suppose her school days ended when she took over as homemaker because her formal education ended with the eighth grade. However, her education never stopped. She was a prodigious reader and very interested in what was going on in the world.
I'm sure they must have been a loving family, because as they all grew older we could feel their affection and concern for one another. I also think they were happy people although their amusements were simple. Mother always took part in church activities and probably that is where most of their social life was spent although she did tell of skating on the Aroostook River and of having "box socials", probably in a schoolhouse.
After her father Hiram died, Blanche went to Lowell, Massachusetts to work in a garment factory making underwear. The hours were from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and she told of how tiring the days were spent at the sewing machine. During this time she lived with a family named Fisher with whom Annie her sister had also lived.Apparently she was treated as one of the family because she always spoke of them all as close and loved friends. She also worshiped with them at their church.
After about a year spent in Lowell, Blanche returned to Caribou and married Clyde Morgan on 26 October 1910. Clyde worked for his father, George Melvin Morgan, in the furniture store and as an embalmer and undertaker. They lived with Clyde's parents on Sweden Street in Caribou for the first two years of their married life and produced Regna Louise on 11 June 1911. They then built a house on Washburn Street with the Aroostook Valley Railroad tracks running nearly parallel with the house. Arline Blanche was born in that house on 13 June 1913. It was from that fenced-in yard on 24 May 1915, that Arline either walked through an unclosed gate or under a gap in the fence and onto those railroad tracks to be run over by the train and maimed for life. There followed a terrifying and anxious time spent tending a small paralyzed body at home and finally in Children's Hospital in Portland, Maine before they brought their baby home to learn again to walk in high laced shoes--the left one stuffed with padding in place of toes and a left hand with only one finger and thumb. After this trying time, they brought suit against the Aroostook Valley Railroad and after hearing that the brakeman and the engineer had been angry at each other and not speaking so the brakeman didn't tell the engineer he could see something on the track, they received judgement--the princely sum of $4,500.
Washburn Street was no home for them now so they built another house on Page Avenue which was home to all of us until her death. In that house I was born, Dorothy Hazel on 8 June 1919; Ruth Avis on 22 August 1921 and Marjorie Lillian on 24 January 1925.
I believe that where my mother was, was also home to her brothers and sisters and why wouldn't it have been, since she had been like a mother to them most of her life. My earliest memories were of Aunt Annie Pike Jacobs being in our home and when Aunt Annie died it really became home for Hollis Jacobs who at the age of 11 came to live with us. He lived with us the next five or six years sharing our life as the brother we never had through the lean depression years when another child to feed and clothe must have made things a little harder for my parents. I'm sure they never begrudged anything they gave to anyone. I remember the summer months through the 1930's when men and boys from all parts of the country followed the harvest hoping for work. Many times Mother fed them on the back porch of our home, sometimes as payment for odd jobs but more often because they were hungary. She would say, "I feel so sorry for that boy, so far from home and with nothing to eat."
Alda and Clara Jacobs also considered our home their home after their mother's death since they no longer had a home of their own. They would find work for awhile or spend time with Uncle William Pike's family or Aunt Jennie Farley's or some of the Jacobs family but seemed to gravitate toward our home.
Through our growing years we had many who stayed with us. Some girls from New Sweden who boarded with us while they went to high school (one paid board--$3 per week). Earl Robinson also stayed with us and went to school one year although I do not know the circumstances that brought him.
It seems there was love enough to go around because through the years they all came back to visit and were always greeted with joy and affection.
Mother's sincere religious beliefs showed in her daily life and the love she had for her family and friends flowed back to her. To me it shows in one little way--her neices, Alda Blanche Jacobs, Shirley Blanche Pike, Blanche Lillian Pike, my sister Arline Blanche (surely my father's doing), and her granddaughter, Coralie Blanche Todd.
Blanche and Clyde Morgan were members of the Free Baptist Church and when that church united with the First Baptist Church they became members of Caribou's United Baptist Church. Blanche was one of the members honored during the laying of the Cornerstone of their new edifice on High Street in Caribou during the 1950s. Many times I walked past her bedroom door as she knelt by her bed to pray before retiring. I can still see her in her long nightgown and her dark hair in a long braid down her back.
Blanche suffered her first heart attack in 1943 but recovered after a long period of tender nursing by her daughter Ruth, to carry on a fairly active life for the next ten or fifteen years. Through the late 1950s and until her death she had several smaller attacks and a slight stroke. Her indomitable spirit survived her loss of many loved ones through those years but when she lost her beloved Clyde on 22 November 1962, she seemed to lose interest in living. I joined her for lunch nearly every work day since my work as Clerk of Court is almost across the street in the County Courthouse. It seemed to me that as I ate with her in hopes to encourage her to eat, I gained weight and she got thinner. We, her daughters, asked her if she ever thought we'd call her "Littla Mama". Another heart attack came in March of 1964. Seemingly, she had recovered and her doctor had told her she could be discharged from the hospital on 6 April 1964, which was a Sunday. Thoughtful of others as she always was, she told him she would wait until Monday when her housekeeper would be back and we, her children, would not have to leave our homes to spend the night with her. She died that night while still in the hospital--6 April 1964. 
PIKE Blanche Hazel (I28994)
 
176 BLANCHE HAZEL (PIKE) MORGAN
1889-1964
by Dorothy Hazel (Morgan) Barnes
Blanche Hazel Pike was born 27 April 1889, the tenth child of Hiram Pike, Jr., and the fourth child by his second wife, Clara Alice (Merritt) Pike.
She was nicknamed "Bunch" and "Bunny" by her family and friends while growing up, although in my lifetime I only heard her called "Blanche". She grew to be 5'5" tall and must have been very slim at the time of her marriage since she had a waist measurement of twenty-one inches. By the time she reached her late forties she weighed approximately 170 pounds.
From hearing my mother, Blanche Pike Morgan reminisce through the years, I'm sure life was hard for the whole family from childhood. She told of winters when the snow sifted through cracks around the windows and onto the beds as they slept in the home on the Washburn Road (Noble Farm). She also told of how they carried water in pails from the Caribou Stream, some one hundred yards from the house, , to be heated on the cook stove in a "boiler" or tub for washing clothes, cooking baths and all other purposes. She told how they walked from that home to school in what is now the Sincock School--probably two and one-half to three miles, sometimes arriving with sodden clothes. She told of having to stand in the corner by the stove for being late for school and feeling so sick from the heat and the smell of wet clothes.
My heart always aches a little for a little girl of 13 years left with the responsibility of cooking and cleaning for a family. She told me of scrubbing bare pine floors until they came white and clean and how bad she always felt when "the boys would come in with muddy feet" getting them dirty again. She told us of her inexperienced cooking and of how her father coming home from his work tasted and seasoned the food, and of doing the family wash by hand.
Apparently theirs was always an industrious family, because Mother told of their digging dandelion greens, a spring delicacy in this area, and selling them from door to door to the townspeople. She always chuckled when she told us of how they would wash them well in the Caribou Stream, thus keeping them crisp and filling their containers which would have held more greans if they had wilted. They also picked wild berries and she told of asking her father to "make Jennie help pick" but that Jennie was the baby and wasn't required to help. When Uncle Charles Pike came to visit our home in 1937 after being gone for many years, he remarked upon that fact and said how unfair they had been in giving all their loving attention to the baby without appreciation for Blanche's heavy burden. Knowing her sweet and loving nature, I cannot believe that my Mother ever showed or even felt any jealousy over that fact although she surely must have been very discouraged at times.
I suppose her school days ended when she took over as homemaker because her formal education ended with the eighth grade. However, her education never stopped. She was a prodigious reader and very interested in what was going on in the world.
I'm sure they must have been a loving family, because as they all grew older we could feel their affection and concern for one another. I also think they were happy people although their amusements were simple. Mother always took part in church activities and probably that is where most of their social life was spent although she did tell of skating on the Aroostook River and of having "box socials", probably in a schoolhouse.
After her father Hiram died, Blanche went to Lowell, Massachusetts to work in a garment factory making underwear. The hours were from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and she told of how tiring the days were spent at the sewing machine. During this time she lived with a family named Fisher with whom Annie her sister had also lived.Apparently she was treated as one of the family because she always spoke of them all as close and loved friends. She also worshiped with them at their church.
After about a year spent in Lowell, Blanche returned to Caribou and married Clyde Morgan on 26 October 1910. Clyde worked for his father, George Melvin Morgan, in the furniture store and as an embalmer and undertaker. They lived with Clyde's parents on Sweden Street in Caribou for the first two years of their married life and produced Regna Louise on 11 June 1911. They then built a house on Washburn Street with the Aroostook Valley Railroad tracks running nearly parallel with the house. Arline Blanche was born in that house on 13 June 1913. It was from that fenced-in yard on 24 May 1915, that Arline either walked through an unclosed gate or under a gap in the fence and onto those railroad tracks to be run over by the train and maimed for life. There followed a terrifying and anxious time spent tending a small paralyzed body at home and finally in Children's Hospital in Portland, Maine before they brought their baby home to learn again to walk in high laced shoes--the left one stuffed with padding in place of toes and a left hand with only one finger and thumb. After this trying time, they brought suit against the Aroostook Valley Railroad and after hearing that the brakeman and the engineer had been angry at each other and not speaking so the brakeman didn't tell the engineer he could see something on the track, they received judgement--the princely sum of $4,500.
Washburn Street was no home for them now so they built another house on Page Avenue which was home to all of us until her death. In that house I was born, Dorothy Hazel on 8 June 1919; Ruth Avis on 22 August 1921 and Marjorie Lillian on 24 January 1925.
I believe that where my mother was, was also home to her brothers and sisters and why wouldn't it have been, since she had been like a mother to them most of her life. My earliest memories were of Aunt Annie Pike Jacobs being in our home and when Aunt Annie died it really became home for Hollis Jacobs who at the age of 11 came to live with us. He lived with us the next five or six years sharing our life as the brother we never had through the lean depression years when another child to feed and clothe must have made things a little harder for my parents. I'm sure they never begrudged anything they gave to anyone. I remember the summer months through the 1930's when men and boys from all parts of the country followed the harvest hoping for work. Many times Mother fed them on the back porch of our home, sometimes as payment for odd jobs but more often because they were hungary. She would say, "I feel so sorry for that boy, so far from home and with nothing to eat."
Alda and Clara Jacobs also considered our home their home after their mother's death since they no longer had a home of their own. They would find work for awhile or spend time with Uncle William Pike's family or Aunt Jennie Farley's or some of the Jacobs family but seemed to gravitate toward our home.
Through our growing years we had many who stayed with us. Some girls from New Sweden who boarded with us while they went to high school (one paid board--$3 per week). Earl Robinson also stayed with us and went to school one year although I do not know the circumstances that brought him.
It seems there was love enough to go around because through the years they all came back to visit and were always greeted with joy and affection.
Mother's sincere religious beliefs showed in her daily life and the love she had for her family and friends flowed back to her. To me it shows in one little way--her neices, Alda Blanche Jacobs, Shirley Blanche Pike, Blanche Lillian Pike, my sister Arline Blanche (surely my father's doing), and her granddaughter, Coralie Blanche Todd.
Blanche and Clyde Morgan were members of the Free Baptist Church and when that church united with the First Baptist Church they became members of Caribou's United Baptist Church. Blanche was one of the members honored during the laying of the Cornerstone of their new edifice on High Street in Caribou during the 1950s. Many times I walked past her bedroom door as she knelt by her bed to pray before retiring. I can still see her in her long nightgown and her dark hair in a long braid down her back.
Blanche suffered her first heart attack in 1943 but recovered after a long period of tender nursing by her daughter Ruth, to carry on a fairly active life for the next ten or fifteen years. Through the late 1950s and until her death she had several smaller attacks and a slight stroke. Her indomitable spirit survived her loss of many loved ones through those years but when she lost her beloved Clyde on 22 November 1962, she seemed to lose interest in living. I joined her for lunch nearly every work day since my work as Clerk of Court is almost across the street in the County Courthouse. It seemed to me that as I ate with her in hopes to encourage her to eat, I gained weight and she got thinner. We, her daughters, asked her if she ever thought we'd call her "Littla Mama". Another heart attack came in March of 1964. Seemingly, she had recovered and her doctor had told her she could be discharged from the hospital on 6 April 1964, which was a Sunday. Thoughtful of others as she always was, she told him she would wait until Monday when her housekeeper would be back and we, her children, would not have to leave our homes to spend the night with her. She died that night while still in the hospital--6 April 1964. 
PIKE Blanche Hazel "Bunch\Bunny" (I151)
 
177 BLANCHE HAZEL (PIKE) MORGAN
1889-1964
by Dorothy Hazel (Morgan) Barnes
Blanche Hazel Pike was born 27 April 1889, the tenth child of Hiram Pike, Jr., and the fourth child by his second wife, Clara Alice (Merritt) Pike.
She was nicknamed "Bunch" and "Bunny" by her family and friends while growing up, although in my lifetime I only heard her called "Blanche". She grew to be 5'5" tall and must have been very slim at the time of her marriage since she had a waist measurement of twenty-one inches. By the time she reached her late forties she weighed approximately 170 pounds.
From hearing my mother, Blanche Pike Morgan reminisce through the years, I'm sure life was hard for the whole family from childhood. She told of winters when the snow sifted through cracks around the windows and onto the beds as they slept in the home on the Washburn Road (Noble Farm). She also told of how they carried water in pails from the Caribou Stream, some one hundred yards from the house, , to be heated on the cook stove in a "boiler" or tub for washing clothes, cooking baths and all other purposes. She told how they walked from that home to school in what is now the Sincock School--probably two and one-half to three miles, sometimes arriving with sodden clothes. She told of having to stand in the corner by the stove for being late for school and feeling so sick from the heat and the smell of wet clothes.
My heart always aches a little for a little girl of 13 years left with the responsibility of cooking and cleaning for a family. She told me of scrubbing bare pine floors until they came white and clean and how bad she always felt when "the boys would come in with muddy feet" getting them dirty again. She told us of her inexperienced cooking and of how her father coming home from his work tasted and seasoned the food, and of doing the family wash by hand.
Apparently theirs was always an industrious family, because Mother told of their digging dandelion greens, a spring delicacy in this area, and selling them from door to door to the townspeople. She always chuckled when she told us of how they would wash them well in the Caribou Stream, thus keeping them crisp and filling their containers which would have held more greans if they had wilted. They also picked wild berries and she told of asking her father to "make Jennie help pick" but that Jennie was the baby and wasn't required to help. When Uncle Charles Pike came to visit our home in 1937 after being gone for many years, he remarked upon that fact and said how unfair they had been in giving all their loving attention to the baby without appreciation for Blanche's heavy burden. Knowing her sweet and loving nature, I cannot believe that my Mother ever showed or even felt any jealousy over that fact although she surely must have been very discouraged at times.
I suppose her school days ended when she took over as homemaker because her formal education ended with the eighth grade. However, her education never stopped. She was a prodigious reader and very interested in what was going on in the world.
I'm sure they must have been a loving family, because as they all grew older we could feel their affection and concern for one another. I also think they were happy people although their amusements were simple. Mother always took part in church activities and probably that is where most of their social life was spent although she did tell of skating on the Aroostook River and of having "box socials", probably in a schoolhouse.
After her father Hiram died, Blanche went to Lowell, Massachusetts to work in a garment factory making underwear. The hours were from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and she told of how tiring the days were spent at the sewing machine. During this time she lived with a family named Fisher with whom Annie her sister had also lived.Apparently she was treated as one of the family because she always spoke of them all as close and loved friends. She also worshiped with them at their church.
After about a year spent in Lowell, Blanche returned to Caribou and married Clyde Morgan on 26 October 1910. Clyde worked for his father, George Melvin Morgan, in the furniture store and as an embalmer and undertaker. They lived with Clyde's parents on Sweden Street in Caribou for the first two years of their married life and produced Regna Louise on 11 June 1911. They then built a house on Washburn Street with the Aroostook Valley Railroad tracks running nearly parallel with the house. Arline Blanche was born in that house on 13 June 1913. It was from that fenced-in yard on 24 May 1915, that Arline either walked through an unclosed gate or under a gap in the fence and onto those railroad tracks to be run over by the train and maimed for life. There followed a terrifying and anxious time spent tending a small paralyzed body at home and finally in Children's Hospital in Portland, Maine before they brought their baby home to learn again to walk in high laced shoes--the left one stuffed with padding in place of toes and a left hand with only one finger and thumb. After this trying time, they brought suit against the Aroostook Valley Railroad and after hearing that the brakeman and the engineer had been angry at each other and not speaking so the brakeman didn't tell the engineer he could see something on the track, they received judgement--the princely sum of $4,500.
Washburn Street was no home for them now so they built another house on Page Avenue which was home to all of us until her death. In that house I was born, Dorothy Hazel on 8 June 1919; Ruth Avis on 22 August 1921 and Marjorie Lillian on 24 January 1925.
I believe that where my mother was, was also home to her brothers and sisters and why wouldn't it have been, since she had been like a mother to them most of her life. My earliest memories were of Aunt Annie Pike Jacobs being in our home and when Aunt Annie died it really became home for Hollis Jacobs who at the age of 11 came to live with us. He lived with us the next five or six years sharing our life as the brother we never had through the lean depression years when another child to feed and clothe must have made things a little harder for my parents. I'm sure they never begrudged anything they gave to anyone. I remember the summer months through the 1930's when men and boys from all parts of the country followed the harvest hoping for work. Many times Mother fed them on the back porch of our home, sometimes as payment for odd jobs but more often because they were hungary. She would say, "I feel so sorry for that boy, so far from home and with nothing to eat."
Alda and Clara Jacobs also considered our home their home after their mother's death since they no longer had a home of their own. They would find work for awhile or spend time with Uncle William Pike's family or Aunt Jennie Farley's or some of the Jacobs family but seemed to gravitate toward our home.
Through our growing years we had many who stayed with us. Some girls from New Sweden who boarded with us while they went to high school (one paid board--$3 per week). Earl Robinson also stayed with us and went to school one year although I do not know the circumstances that brought him.
It seems there was love enough to go around because through the years they all came back to visit and were always greeted with joy and affection.
Mother's sincere religious beliefs showed in her daily life and the love she had for her family and friends flowed back to her. To me it shows in one little way--her neices, Alda Blanche Jacobs, Shirley Blanche Pike, Blanche Lillian Pike, my sister Arline Blanche (surely my father's doing), and her granddaughter, Coralie Blanche Todd.
Blanche and Clyde Morgan were members of the Free Baptist Church and when that church united with the First Baptist Church they became members of Caribou's United Baptist Church. Blanche was one of the members honored during the laying of the Cornerstone of their new edifice on High Street in Caribou during the 1950s. Many times I walked past her bedroom door as she knelt by her bed to pray before retiring. I can still see her in her long nightgown and her dark hair in a long braid down her back.
Blanche suffered her first heart attack in 1943 but recovered after a long period of tender nursing by her daughter Ruth, to carry on a fairly active life for the next ten or fifteen years. Through the late 1950s and until her death she had several smaller attacks and a slight stroke. Her indomitable spirit survived her loss of many loved ones through those years but when she lost her beloved Clyde on 22 November 1962, she seemed to lose interest in living. I joined her for lunch nearly every work day since my work as Clerk of Court is almost across the street in the County Courthouse. It seemed to me that as I ate with her in hopes to encourage her to eat, I gained weight and she got thinner. We, her daughters, asked her if she ever thought we'd call her "Littla Mama". Another heart attack came in March of 1964. Seemingly, she had recovered and her doctor had told her she could be discharged from the hospital on 6 April 1964, which was a Sunday. Thoughtful of others as she always was, she told him she would wait until Monday when her housekeeper would be back and we, her children, would not have to leave our homes to spend the night with her. She died that night while still in the hospital--6 April 1964. 
PIKE Blanche Hazel "Bunch\Bunny" (I432)
 
178 Descendants of Reverend William Noyes

He was deputy to General Court or Assembly 1713, 1717, 1725, 1727, 1729, 1733. (Conn. Col. Rec., Vol 5, pp. 19, 363, 513, Vol. 7, pp. 123, 251, 424).

In 1723 he was made Captain of Militia. The Conn. Col. Rec., Vol. 6, p. 371, says: "This assembly do establish and confirm Mr. Thomas Noyes, of Stonington, to be Captain of the First Company or Train Band in the town of Stonington, and order that he be commissioned accordingly."

In the years 1723 and 1724 the Assembly named him as a Justice of the Peace for New Haven County. (Conn. Col. Rec., Vol. 6, pp. 379, 456).

In 1925 he was one of a Committee to partition off the parish of Groton, and set up the worship of God there. Representative of the town of Stonington 1714-'15-'16-'17-'22-'23-'24-'25-'26 and Selectman during the same years.

Miss Wheeler, in her "old Homes in Stonington," refers to the home of Thomas as follows: "Capt. Noyes built this house after his marriage in 1705 to Elizabeth, daughter of Gov. Peleg Sanford and granddaughter of Gov. William Coddington of Rhode Island. He and his son James were Colonial officers. Capt. Noyes was a man of considerable property, and he it was who sent to England and had the Coat of Arms cut upon a stone and placed over the grave of his father, our first minister, Rev. James Noyes, who was buried at Wequetequock. This house which he built, is set back from the road some little distance and impresses one with a grand hospitable air. It is large, square, unpainted, with a hip or quail trap roof, truly in style a mansion house. The broad front door has the old fashioned iron ring for the knocker, with the small panes of glass over the top. From the front hall below, the stairs can be seen winding away into the upper story and again winding on into the garret. The great east room seventeen feet square has the old-fashioned corner cupboard, which now can be found very beautiful and ancient crockery, not belonging to the Noyes family, but to the present occupants. The west side of the room is ceiled from top to floor, the width of some of the boards are beyond belief unless they are seen. The kitchen has the old styled dresser for crockery, and the summer beams show in all the rooms. Ah! Could this house speak, what a history it would give of Revolutionary heroes, of whom Col. Peleg Noyes was one, being Captain at Fort Griswold in 1777. What stories of love and war, heartaches and sorrows borne patiently, and of lives lived out in their fulness and gone on into the unlimited beyond where all shall be satisfied. This place has long remained in the Noyes name from the time of Capt. Noyes to the present when it now belongs to the daughter of Mr. George and Martha (Noyes) Noyes, Mrs. Orson C. Rogers." The house he build was still standing in 1904.

He was, with his wife, admitted to the church on June 26, 1737. He died in Stonington, Conn., at the home of one of his sons. He is buried in the Wequetequock burying ground, about half way between Stonington, Conn., and Westerly, R.I. 
Capt. NOYES Thomas (I26001)
 
179 Descendants of Reverend William Noyes

He was deputy to General Court or Assembly 1713, 1717, 1725, 1727, 1729, 1733. (Conn. Col. Rec., Vol 5, pp. 19, 363, 513, Vol. 7, pp. 123, 251, 424).

In 1723 he was made Captain of Militia. The Conn. Col. Rec., Vol. 6, p. 371, says: "This assembly do establish and confirm Mr. Thomas Noyes, of Stonington, to be Captain of the First Company or Train Band in the town of Stonington, and order that he be commissioned accordingly."

In the years 1723 and 1724 the Assembly named him as a Justice of the Peace for New Haven County. (Conn. Col. Rec., Vol. 6, pp. 379, 456).

In 1925 he was one of a Committee to partition off the parish of Groton, and set up the worship of God there. Representative of the town of Stonington 1714-'15-'16-'17-'22-'23-'24-'25-'26 and Selectman during the same years.

Miss Wheeler, in her "old Homes in Stonington," refers to the home of Thomas as follows: "Capt. Noyes built this house after his marriage in 1705 to Elizabeth, daughter of Gov. Peleg Sanford and granddaughter of Gov. William Coddington of Rhode Island. He and his son James were Colonial officers. Capt. Noyes was a man of considerable property, and he it was who sent to England and had the Coat of Arms cut upon a stone and placed over the grave of his father, our first minister, Rev. James Noyes, who was buried at Wequetequock. This house which he built, is set back from the road some little distance and impresses one with a grand hospitable air. It is large, square, unpainted, with a hip or quail trap roof, truly in style a mansion house. The broad front door has the old fashioned iron ring for the knocker, with the small panes of glass over the top. From the front hall below, the stairs can be seen winding away into the upper story and again winding on into the garret. The great east room seventeen feet square has the old-fashioned corner cupboard, which now can be found very beautiful and ancient crockery, not belonging to the Noyes family, but to the present occupants. The west side of the room is ceiled from top to floor, the width of some of the boards are beyond belief unless they are seen. The kitchen has the old styled dresser for crockery, and the summer beams show in all the rooms. Ah! Could this house speak, what a history it would give of Revolutionary heroes, of whom Col. Peleg Noyes was one, being Captain at Fort Griswold in 1777. What stories of love and war, heartaches and sorrows borne patiently, and of lives lived out in their fulness and gone on into the unlimited beyond where all shall be satisfied. This place has long remained in the Noyes name from the time of Capt. Noyes to the present when it now belongs to the daughter of Mr. George and Martha (Noyes) Noyes, Mrs. Orson C. Rogers." The house he build was still standing in 1904.

He was, with his wife, admitted to the church on June 26, 1737. He died in Stonington, Conn., at the home of one of his sons. He is buried in the Wequetequock burying ground, about half way between Stonington, Conn., and Westerly, R.I. 
Capt. NOYES Thomas (I2533)
 
180 Extract from an article in the "Masonic Advocate"

Hon. Daniel Noyes was born at Poultney, Vt., June 27, A.D. 1830. His family was one of the oldest and most highly respected of the New England colony, and his ancestors, known historically as "Green Mountain Boys", assisted in the Revolutionary war for American independence.

When Judge Noyes was quite young, his mother removed to Seneca Falls, N.Y., where the subject of this sketch attended the academy of that place, from which he graduated in 1843. In 1844, young Noyes entered Genoa College, and remained there as a student for three years. In 1847 he entered Union College at Schenectady, N.Y., and graduated therefrom with honors in 1848. He immediately entered the law office of Clark & Underwood, at Auburn, N.Y., as a student, where he remained, pursuing his studies of the law, until 1851, when he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the State by examination, in which he achieved great distinction.

In the spring of 1852 Judge Noyes started for the West, for the purpose of seeking a permanent home, and engaging in the practice of his profession. After visiting many towns on the prairies of Illinois and in the wilds of Wisconsin, he visited La Porte, which he soon selected as a home, and resided there through 1904. It took but a short time for him to achieve such distinction at the bar as to place him among the leading and most prominent attorneys of the northern part of the State.

Judge Noyes was elected mayor of La Porte for three several terms of two years each. He held the office of county attorney for years; was elected judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and served until that court was abolished by State legislation.

In November, 1876, he was elected judge of the Thirty-second Judicial Circuit, and held the office continuously through 1904. His reputation as a judge was above criticism - honest, conscientious, intelligent, and possessed of the very highest executive ability. His decisions and conduct of the court's business commanded the respect of the bar and the most zealous regard of honest litigants, and of the people. It was a conceded fact that, if he desired, he could be elected again to the office he so acceptable filled for the past eighteen years.

Judge Noyes was never anxious to hold what were generally termed high offices. Often he declined the congressional nomination, and refused a position on the Supreme Bench. His sole ambition was to stand high in the estimation of the better class of men in his section of the State, and to honorably and intelligently discharge every public and private duty. 
Hon. NOYES Daniel (I20154)
 
181 Sick of Army Life

"Louis Noyes, who is serving with the regular army and is stationed on an island off the coast of Florida, was called home this week to attend the funeral of his mother. Louis enlisted for three years and has served ten months of this time. Like nearly every other regular army man Louis is not exactly pleased with his "job" and is waiting impatiently for the time to come when he will receive his discharge and when he can shake the army dust off of his shoes.

The young man who enlists in the regular army thinking the life of a soldier is a "snap" generally changes his mind after about the first two months of service and he finds that the daily routine of eat, sleep, drill and eat, sleep, drill becomes terribly monotonous in a very short time, and the worst feature of it all is the young soldier learns little if anything else that is worth a continental to him when he leaves the army and tries to make a living for himself." 
NOYES Louis Chalmer (I24198)
 
182 [From Miss Wheeler's "Old Homes in Stonington"]

"Dea. John Noyes, brother of Capt. Thomas, built the house near Westerly, now known as the "Moss House", in 1714. Dea. John's second wife was a great-granddaughter of Gov. William Bradford, second governor of Plymouth Colony. This house is large, with a square roof, and spacious rooms are on both floors. It has no cellar underneath, being built upon a ledge, though the cellar stairs go down the front hall and end upon a flat rock. This farm was included in the grant of land from the State of Connecticut to Thomas Stanton, the Interpreter General of New England, and by his will it was given to his son-in-law, Rev. James Noyes, and from him to his son, Deacon John, and to his son Joseph Noyes, and from him to his son, Deacon John, and to his son Joseph Noyes, who lived and died there. He sold it to Nathaniel Palmer, and from him it descended to his son Luke, who lived here.

There were two race courses, eighty rods long, on the farm, where hundreds of people used to assemble to witness the races often held there. Still later Mr. Jesse Moss owned and renovated the house, so that it is now in good repair, and looks as if it would remain habitable a century more. Some of the land about the house has been sold within the past few years, so that the farm is reduced in size, but the new and commodious houses which have sprung up all about here, show that many houses have taken the place where used to be but one, which at the time this house was built was without neighbors. Mr. Moss was interested in making the land about the place beautiful to the eye as well as productive, and the broad and beautiful fields lying before the door will probably soon find a dividing line between them, where now the acres are without fence or wall, or even a stone upon their smooth surface." 
Deacon NOYES John (I25985)
 
183 [From Miss Wheeler's "Old Homes in Stonington"]

"Dea. John Noyes, brother of Capt. Thomas, built the house near Westerly, now known as the "Moss House", in 1714. Dea. John's second wife was a great-granddaughter of Gov. William Bradford, second governor of Plymouth Colony. This house is large, with a square roof, and spacious rooms are on both floors. It has no cellar underneath, being built upon a ledge, though the cellar stairs go down the front hall and end upon a flat rock. This farm was included in the grant of land from the State of Connecticut to Thomas Stanton, the Interpreter General of New England, and by his will it was given to his son-in-law, Rev. James Noyes, and from him to his son, Deacon John, and to his son Joseph Noyes, and from him to his son, Deacon John, and to his son Joseph Noyes, who lived and died there. He sold it to Nathaniel Palmer, and from him it descended to his son Luke, who lived here.

There were two race courses, eighty rods long, on the farm, where hundreds of people used to assemble to witness the races often held there. Still later Mr. Jesse Moss owned and renovated the house, so that it is now in good repair, and looks as if it would remain habitable a century more. Some of the land about the house has been sold within the past few years, so that the farm is reduced in size, but the new and commodious houses which have sprung up all about here, show that many houses have taken the place where used to be but one, which at the time this house was built was without neighbors. Mr. Moss was interested in making the land about the place beautiful to the eye as well as productive, and the broad and beautiful fields lying before the door will probably soon find a dividing line between them, where now the acres are without fence or wall, or even a stone upon their smooth surface." 
Deacon NOYES John Stanton (I2247)
 
184 ORLANDO G. NOYES: Among the respected and worthy citizens of Coldwater now living retired is numbered Orlando G. Noyes, whose birth occurred on Chestnut street in Rochester, New York, August 1, 1839. The family is of English lineage, and the grandfather, Samuel P. Noyes, was born and lived in the east. His son, Samuel P. Noyes, Jr., was born in the southeastern part of Vermont in 1803. and during his active business career engaged in the manufacture of shoe pegs and lasts, conducting a factory in Rochester. He wedded Mary Brezee, who was a native of Connecticut and was of French and English lineage. They became the parents of nine children, of whom one son and one daughter died in early life, while the others reached adult age.
Orlando G. Noyes, the eldest of the seven who grew to manhood and womanhood, was reared in Rochester and in Penfield, New York, and pursued his education in the common schools. He afterward assisted his father in business until the latter's death. When only thirteen years of age he began learning the printer's trade, and to that pursuit largely gave his time and attention until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when in 1861 he enlisted as a musician of the Ninth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, serving for eleven months. He was captured at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, being taken prisoner by Generals Foster and Wheeler. He was paroled, however, about ten miles southeast of McMinnville, Tennessee, and returned to Nashville, whence he made his way to Coldwater, Michigan, where he had located in 1846, his parents in that year having established their home here, while the father carried on business as a boot and shoe merchant.
Mr. Noyes worked in the printing office of the Coldwater Sentinel, of which Elihu B. Pond was the editor and proprietor. He continued with that paper for two or three years, after which he entered the office of the Branch County Republican, remaining in that employ until the time of his enlistment in the Civil war. Following the close of hostilities and his return to Coldwater Mr. Noyes was engaged in the liquor business in connection with his father, manufacturing and rectifying whisky for about two years. He also conducted a billiard hall for some time and had a soda water fountain. Later he spent about six months in Chicago, and subsequent to his return to Coldwater he was elected city marshal, which position he held for two terms. Later he and Frank Noyes built and conducted what is known as the Farmers' Feed Stables, beginning the business in January, 1892, and conducting the same until 1904. He then went to Denver, Colorado, where he spent three months in visiting his brother, Frank Noyes, an expert violin manufacturer, whose violins are known throughout the world, and have been tested in comparison with some of the old and famous instruments, including the Stradivarius, which are worth four thousand dollars. The violins manufactured by Mr. Noyes were found to be of superior grade and workmanship. Following his visit in the west Orlando G. Noyes returned to Coldwater, where he is now living practically retired, but he and his brother Frank own property here, including the west half of the Noyes block. The east store of the Noyes block is now owned by the Eldridge heirs, Mrs. Amelia Hobbie, of Kankakee, Ill., Mrs. Florence Vankirk, and Mrs. Josephine Smith, of Nomence, Ill. The three-story brick block at the corner of Chicago and Hanchett streets was built by S. P. Noyes, Jr., and his son, Orlando G. Noyes, in 1866, and is known as the Noyes block, located on the northeast corner of Chicago and Hanchett Streets, Coldwater. He resides at No. 34 Hanchett street, where he has lived for fifty-three years.
Mr. Noyes is a member of the Masonic fraternity in good standing, and exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft. He was raised to the sublime degree of a Master Mason September 10, 1869, and has since affiliated with the organization. He is likewise a charter member of Butterworth Post, G. A. R., and of the Union Veterans' Union, and he had the honor of presenting the name of W. W. Barrett, which was accepted.
Mr. Noyes was married in 1884 to Miss Emma Haines, the youngest daughter of Robert and Julia Haines, of Ovid township, Branch county, Michigan. He has lived in Coldwater for fifty-nine years and may well be classed with the pioneers of Branch county. In early life he have his political support to the Democratic party, and in 1872 voted for Horace Greeley, while in 1904 he cast his ballot for Theodore Roosevelt. In 1876 he delivered many political speeches in behalf of the Greenback party. He has been a close student of political economy and the questions of the day, and few men are better informed concerning the issues which now divide the two great parties. He has contributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding of Coldwater and has much more than a passing interest in its welfare and progress. On many occasions he has given active support to measures for the general good and his labors along this line have been far-reaching and beneficial. (Transcribed by Mary J. Bickford, April 8, 2001.)

Hist. of Branch County: p 146 There is mention of the first Fire Dept. of Coldwater. In August 1856 the Excelsior Fire Company, No. 1. was organized and in October of the same year, a hose company was formed, limited to twenty boys, of which Orland NOYES is listed.

p 155 This page is listing the officers of the City of Coldwater (chartered in 1861).
For the year 1878, Orlando G. NOYES is listed as Marshal. 
NOYES Orlando G. (I42753)
 
185 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I39181)
 
186 From the Pike Family History Records by Miriam Enid Pike Howard. "Benjamin Franklin Pike and Harriet lived in New Sharon, ME on the left side of the old road as it swings left at the top of the hill going toward Mercer. There was a story that he had quarrelled with a man who lived across the road. He was arrested and fined $10.00. After paying the fine he said, "Cheap Enough". He is buried in New Sharon, ME. A White Marble stone about 6 (Correction Block 8- Lot 5 - from the cemetery Map seen be me on 21 Sept. 1999. REP - [Picture of stone in Scrapbook] ) lots from the road, near a tall, square shaft with a flat top. Harriet went to live in Augusta after his death, after being a housekeeper for Captain Thatcher in Mercer for awhile. In Augusta she kept house for Charlie Cobb, a barber, and his son Archie. She is buried in Maple Cemetery at Winthrop, ME in the center of town.
[See also gravestone pictures of 1994 from Maple Cemetery, Winthrop, ME. "Benjamin Franklin Pike, 1809-1848]REP Note: While his name is on the stone in Winthrop I believe that he is buried in New Sharon, Maine with his two infant children. On Tuesday September 21, 1999, I, Roy Escott Pike, found the gravesite and stone of Benjamin Pike. It is a large White Marble stone which gives the date and says "Benjamin Franklin Pike. I have taken a picture on September 23rd and put it in the FTM Scrapbook. REP
I (REP) have in my collection of Genealogy materials a small book called "Juvenile Instructor", that has the following inscription in the front, "The property of Benjamin F. Pike of Sommersworth - Steal not this book, for fear of shame, for here you will, find the owners name."
In the back of the book is his name written again, "Benjamin F. Pike- Property - Boston."
There are no dates in the book but I have deduced from the information about the number of states in one of the articles that the date is between 1796 and 1812. 
PIKE Benjamin Franklin (I39166)
 
187 From the Pike Family History Records by Miriam Enid Pike Howard. He and Elizabeth lived in Livermore on the Pike Farm. She died there.
From the Pike Family History Records by Miriam Enid Pike Howard. Charles married Harriet Kennison after Elizabeth died. He and Harriet lived in Norridgewock. "While in Noridgewock he worked for the Burnam & Morrill Corn Shop during the canning season and he also was janitor for the library and Congregational Church which stood on the north side of the Kennebec River."
In the "Records of the Pike Family Association of America, 1900-1901", (printed by the Press of W. L. Streeter 1902. at Saco, Maine) on page 17 is recorded that Charles F. Pike of Livermore, Maine was an association member in 1901.
From the Family notes of Miriam Enid Pike Howard: "Charles F. Pike was born in New Sharon, Maine. His father died when he was 5 years old. He went to work for and lived with his uncle John S. Pike when he was about 11 or 12 years old, in Mercer where his mother was housekeeper for Capt. Thatcher. Later he moved to Augusta. He met and married Elizabeth A. Fuller in Winthrop. She was born in LaGrange, Maine. They moved to South Livermore in 1875. Charles owned the little store in Howes Corner, Turner, for several years. Elizabeth was not well and they moved back to the farm in South Livermore where she died of gallstones." 
PIKE Charles Franklin (I39168)
 
188 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I39176)
 
189 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I39175)
 
190 (OBIT: The death of Frank C. Noyes, the well known resident and business man, occurred Friday morning at his home, 45 Ohio Street, after several months decline. He was 71 years old.
Mr. Noyes was the son of Albert and Caroline Noyes of this city and was born in Bangor. He was employed as a sutler clerk during the Civil war, after which he engaged in the stove business with his father, the concern being A. Noyes & Co.
Mr. Noyes continued business until the present year when forced by ill health he resigned the presidency of the Noyes & Nutter Mfg. Co. which he had held for many years, the concern of A. Noyes & Co. being changed to the latter style in 1891. Mr. Noyes leaves three daughters Miss Elizabeth Noyes, Miss May Choate Noyes and Mrs. Wade Brackett of Bangor; two brothers Edmund Dole Noyes of Waterville and Albert G. Noyes of this city, and a sister Mrs. Alfred Webb of Bangor.
He was a Sir Knight of St. John's Commandery and a noble of Kora Temple, Mystic Shrine.
The funeral services will be held Monday at 2 p.m. from the residence 45 Ohio Street.

Ae.71y 7m 20d.) 
NOYES Francis "Frank" Choali (I14897)
 
191 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1453)
 
192 HARRY I. NOYES, of the town of Hampton, an enterprising contractor and builder, was born at Atkinson, N. H., September 9, 1872, a son of Isaac S. and Caroline A. (McCloy) Noyes. The father, a farmer, was a native of Atkinson, his wife Caroline coming from Salem, Mass. Both are now deceased and are buried in the North Parish Cemetery at Haverhill, Mass. Their children were: William, deceased; Helen deceased; Annie, Francis, Aliza B., Harry I.
Harry I. Noyes was educated in the common schools and at Atkinson Academy. He was engaged in the milk business for ten years, driving a cart to Haverhill, and at the same time owning a farm, which he later sold. He then learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked as a journeymn for eight years. At the end of that time he started in for himself in Hampton as contractor and builder and has been successful in business, now employing on an average eight men the year around. He is a Democrat in politics but reserves the right to vote outside of party lines upon fitting occasion. While residing in Atkinson he served on the school board there for ten years. He belongs to the lodge of Elks at Portsmouth, to the Knights of Pythias, the Junior Order of American Mechanics and to the Grange.
Mr. Noyes married, October 17, 1894, Mary L. Emerson, of Hampstead, daughter of James H. and Sarah (Woodman) Emerson, whose other children were a son and daughter, Charles H. and Ruth Ann. Mr. and Mrs. Noyes have been the parents of seven children: Caroline R., Harold E., Roland I., Marion J., Marion S., Arthur W. and one that died in infancy. The family are affiliated religiously with the Congregational church. 
NOYES Harry Isaac (I16016)
 
193 In the fall of 1830 thousands of Choctaw Indians from all three districts in Mississippi gathered near what is today Mashulaville, Mississippi, to consider the proposals of the United States government to give over their lands which consisted of most of north central Mississippi, in return for annuities and lands further west. The decision of this meeting became known as the Dancing Rabbit Treaty.

All full blooded Indians present stood in vigorous opposition to the treaty's acceptance. Only through the influence of the half breed Chief Greenwood Leflore was the treaty signed on 27 September 1830 ceding their lands to the United States government while giving any Indians who wished to remain protection by the federal government and a small tract of land. Unfortunately those Indians had to wait over a hundred years before the white men would keep their promises.

Stories passed down among the Luke family place our ancestor James Luke at these proceedings. According to family legend, he served as and interpreter; this cannot be substantiated by any records. Nevertheless, it is quite conceivable that he as well as other settlers in this area were involved in this treaty, as it would give them access to new lands. A period of several years of confusion followed while land was sorted out and Kemper County was formed.

Familiar to all genealogists and others that work on family histories of immigration to America, our oral history of James Luke and his wife, Martha Reed Luke, starts with three brothers arriving in America in the early 1800's from Ireland with one brother settling in Georgia, while the other two continued on to Alabama.

Land records of Alabama support the theory of immigration to Alabama by the Lukes. Pickens County, Alabama land records show both a James and John Luke owning land there. Martha's father, James Reed is also listed among the land owners, which adds validity to this story since families frequently migrated together for safety as well as companionship.

Further study of Alabama records shows that John Luke, brother to James, stayed in Alabama with his descendants, drifting into Epps and other areas of present day Alabama. John had a son, James who married Lucinda Fleming in Winston County, Mississippi on 26 August 1856 (Bk 3, p. 287). This James served in the War between the States for Mississippi and is buried at Cooksville Cemetery, Noxubee County, Mississippi. This is also the resting place for Mary Reed, mother of Jane and Martha.

It has long been assumed by family members that James Luke was born in Ireland but records indicate otherwise. The 1850 United States census gives his and his wife's birthplaces as South Carolina. However, census records from 1860 through 1900 state that he was born in Georgia. This discrepancy could be due to boundary changes which gave part of South Carolina to Georgia. The 1880 Census states that the father and mother of James Luke were born in Georgia. As a consequence of these findings, it is most probable that it was not our ancestor James and his brothers that immigrated to America but an earlier generation of this family.

Age is another uncertainty. The 1850 Census states he was born in 1810; the 1860 Census says 1808. His tombstone states that he died on November 15, 1889 at age 90, which would make his birth year 1799.

Martha Reed, wife of James, was one of eleven known children of James and Mary Reed. According to census records she was born c.1815 and died 4 November 1881, buried alongside her husband in the old Luke family cemetery. Her father, James Reed, was born around 1792 and died in April 1842. His grave is marked with an imposing obelisk in an unmarked cemetery in Kemper County on land which belongs today to Wess McDonald. Mrs. Reed, born South Carolina, is found in the 1850 census with her son Kit and daughter Elizabeth in the 1850 Census living right next to James and Martha Luke.

Marriage records for several of the siblings of Martha Reed can be found in Winston County, Mississippi.

The old Luke family graveyard, containing the marked graves of both James and Martha Luke along with several of their descendants, is located on land previously owned by the Lukes in what is called Mactown in Kemper County, Mississippi. This land belonged for many years to members of the Baughman family, which is connected by marriage to the Lukes. Today the land is owned by Mr. Tony Luke, a descendant of Daniel "Dock" Luke, thus placing this land back in Luke hand. 
LUKE James R. (I1069)
 
194 Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Enoch Event : Born
Year : Abt 1815
Place : NB
Province of record source : New Brunswick
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa
Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Enoch Event : Living
Year : 1851
Place : Queensbury
Province of record source : New Brunswick
County of record source : York
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa 
MORGAN Enoch (I391)
 
195 Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Enoch Event : Born
Year : Abt 1815
Place : NB
Province of record source : New Brunswick
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa
Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Enoch Event : Living
Year : 1851
Place : Queensbury
Province of record source : New Brunswick
County of record source : York
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa 
MORGAN Enoch (I1812)
 
196 Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Thomas Event : Born
Year : Abt 1813
Place : NB
Province of record source : New Brunswick
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa
Lived on Lot 45, Upper Hainesville, NB, Canada and later divided the farm between sons Fred and Charlie. 
MORGAN Thomas M. (I392)
 
197 Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s
Morgan, Thomas Event : Born
Year : Abt 1813
Place : NB
Province of record source : New Brunswick
Comments : Farmer.
Source : Extracts from the 1851 Federal Census of York County, Microfilm #C998, C1717 & M5221.
Publisher : National Archives of Canada
Publication place : Ottawa
Lived on Lot 45, Upper Hainesville, NB, Canada and later divided the farm between sons Fred and Charlie. 
MORGAN Thomas M. (I1813)
 
198 George T. Morgan was granted Lot #47, Cloverdale, on Feb. 21, 1896, where he and Mae raised their family and ran the Post Office in their country store. They bought blueberries from pickers which George hauled to Houlton, Maine with horse and wagon, traveling in the cool of the night so the berries would stay fresh.

From The Observer of Sept 5, 1912 "CLOVERDALE- George Morgan is doing a rushing business selling blueberries".

From The Observer of Oct 10, 1912 "COLDSTREAM- George Morgan has taken the place of Joel Ellis, mail driver, on the Cloverdale route".

They sold the place to Jim and Gertie Billings in 1913. 
MORGAN George Tyler (I47887)
 
199 Amos Mansfield Kidder's parents removed to Plymouth, N.H., when he was a child of three years and he attended the common schools of that place and took advanced studies at the High school of Chelsea, Mass., thereafter holding clerical positions with mercantile firms and a bank in Boston, finally becoming connected with the Boston and Lynn Railway, of which he became successively a director, treasurer, and manager, thus demonstrating
at an early age his marked business ability.

Mr. Kidder was a man of sterling character and a public spirited citizen. At Plymouth he built the Kidder Block, a large and imposing structure and did much in other ways for the improvement and adornment of the town. He served as a trustee of the Normal School there, and as Overseer of Highways for seven years. He was one of the organizers and a director of the local savings bank, and a deacon in the Congregational Church. In politics he
was a staunch Republican and a firm believer in the doctrine of sound money. 
KIDDER Amos Mansfield (I9105)
 
200 Austin Noyes, a mason by trade, and a general farmer, residing on section 20, Batavia Township, owns 160 acres of good land, half of which is on section 17. He has been a resident of this place since September, 1844, at which time the land was still in a state of nature, and much of it covered with the "forest primeval." Mr. Noyes now has a large portion of it improved, and has a set of farm buildings which compare favorably with any to be found in the township. In September, 1886, he had the misfortune to lose a good barn by lightning, thus entailing heavy loss, but he has since replaced it and is well equipped for the prosecution of his calling.
The subject of this biographical notice is a native of Preston Township, Chenango Co., N.Y., and was born Jan. 11, 1816. He is the youngest but one of a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, born to Samuel P. and Cynthia (Gates) Noyes, natives respectively of Vermont and Massachusetts. Each being born near the State line, they were reared near together and remained with their respective parents until their marriage. After that important event they located on the Vermont side of the line, and there resided until after the birth of their first child, when, about 1804, they removed to Preston, Chenango Co., N. Y., during its early settlement. The father had learned the trade of a mason while a young man in Vermont, and followed it in his new home, in connection with farming. In 1827 the family migrated to Perrinton, Monroe County, where the parents spent the remainder of their days, the father passing away at the ripe old age of eighty-seven years, while his wife had died many years previously, when fifty-seven years of age. The father was a prominent and influential citizen, a well-educated and intelligent man, and was known as an upright citizen. In his early years he utilized his education by engaging in the profession of school teaching; he was also prominent in local politics. In his early years he affilliated with the Democratic party, but later in life he joined the ranks of the Republicans, and died in the faith of that party. He at various times held several of the local offices, including that of Township Clerk in Preston Township, Chenango Co., N.Y., and discharged its duties for a period of twenty years. He and his wife were conscientious members of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Noyes was a brother of the minister of that name in the same church.
Young Noyes was a lad of eleven years when the family removed to Monroe County, N.Y., and he attended the public schools at Perrinton, and subsequently at Rochester, while his education was still further broadened by contact with his intelligent father. He learned the trade of a mason from his father, and remained at the homestead until the date of his marriage, which occurred in the township of Victor, March 21, 1844, with Miss Mary E. Luce, who was born in Troy, N. Y., March 18, 1826, and is the daughter of Robert and Sarah (LaZell) Luce, both of whom are now deceased. The father died in Bristol, Ind., of typhoid fever, while still in middle life, while the mother had passed away some time before, in Oak Orchard Township, Orleans Co., N.Y. Mr. Luce had followed farming the greater part of his life, and he and his excellent wife were industrious and worthy people.
Mrs. Noyes was the fourth in order of birth in the parental family of ten children, and had the misfortune to lose her parents while she was still in her childhood. She went to live with an aunt, with whom she resided until her marriage, and received a good education. Of her union with our subject there have been born two children; Charles B., who took to wife Emma J. Taylor, and resides in the township of Batavia, engaged in faming, and Mary A., the widow of Charles H. Shoecraft, who died in 1881, leaving three children, who reside with their mother in Coldwater Township.
The early education of our subject, both in school and under the parental roof, has pre-eminently fitted him to cope with public questions in an intelligent manner, and he is discreet in forming an opinion and able in maintaining it. He may be said to have been a student all his life, giving special attention to the subject of politics, in which his sympathies are with the Republican party, although he does not yield any slavish obedience. His business ability has been recognized and appreciated by his fellow-townsmen, who have elected him to some of the most important offices within their gift, including those of Justice of the Peace and Highway Commissioner. Socially, he is a member of the Blue Lodge No. 28, F. & A.M., of Union City, and is respected by his large circle of friends and acquaintances for his many sterling qualities. (Transcribed by Mary J. Bickford
April 8, 2001.)

Hist. of Branch County: p 275 Part of the story of Batavia Twp.
Listed as Justice of the Peace in 1870, is Austin NOYES (full time) with Leonard Adams (volunteer).

And in 1871, for the position of School Inspector, Nelson H. Saunders (fulltime) with Charles B. NOYES (volunteer). 
NOYES Austin (I17876)
 

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