Notes


Tree:  

Matches 101 to 150 of 80,634

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101
 
Dr. SMITH Godfrey Christian (I101452)
 
102
 
PARROTTE Martha (I73296)
 
103
 
GRIFFIN Hannah (I66595)
 
104
 
MERRILL Stephen (I31038)
 
105
 
NOYES Russell Tenney (I21150)
 
106
 
NOYES Harriet Hayes (I3789)
 
107
(aged 43 years 9 months; died of asthma with malarial poisoning.)
 
Capt. HARRINGTON William H. (I6448)
 
108
(aged 69 years; died of valvular disease of the heart.)
 
BARTLETT Charles H. (I72030)
 
109
(aged 70 years. Etched In Stone says 15 Oct 1810.

OBIT: The manner of his death was sudden and afflictive; being near an old building (where he was born), which the workmen were employed in pulling down, a part of the side wall, lined with brick, unexpectedly fell outward, and crushed him in so shocking a manner, that he died in a few hours. He was a kind and peaceable neighbor, a good citizen and an honest man.)
 
NOYES Paul (I20926)
 
110
(aged 72 years 11 months 9 days.)
 
WEBSTER Philena (I115446)
 
111
(aged 75 years 7 months.)
 
NOYES Apphia J. (I6428)
 
112
(both Philip and Thomas Eastman built homes in Haverhill before 1675.)
 
EASTMAN Thomas (I106441)
 
113
(Desc. of Nathaniel Brickett incorrectly says 1763.)
 
HASELTINE Abigail (I71530)
 
114
(Everett Distin Dies, Was 50 - Year Resident PLAINVILLE
Everett F. Distin, 77, of 16 Dewey Ave., Died last night. A tool and die maker at the General Electric Co. and a 37 year employee there, he retired 12 years ago. He lived in Plainville more than 50 years and was a World War I Veteran of the Home Guard, Company I. He was known to be a world traveler, and was a member of the Methodist Church here. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Priscilla Noyes of this town and Mrs. Geneva Foss of Newington; 11 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren; and two brothers, Raymond of Plainville and Burton Distin of South Armenia, N.Y. The funeral will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow from the Bailey Funeral Home with burial in Fairview Cemetery, New Britain. Calling hours at the funeral home will be from 7 to 9 o'clock tonight. The family requests those who wish may make donations to the Heart Fund.)
 
DISTIN Everett Francis (I115396)
 
115
(He "takes said Lydia Mireck naked, viz, without any of her late husband's estate.")
 
Family F46482
 
116
(killed with his wife and grandson in a railroad accident.)
 
NOYES Herbert W. (I10852)
 
117
(Local resident, disabled veteran, dies at age 60 PLAINVILLE
William Walentukonis, 60, of 6 Glenwood Dr., died at home yesterday while on leave from Newington Veterans Hospital. Born in New Britain, Nov. 22, 1923, he was the son of the late Peter and Mary (Baron) Walentukonis. He had lived in Plainville for 23 years, moving here from New Britain where he had lived for many years. He worked at the Conn. Light & Power Co., New Britain, for 35 years, recently retiring. He was a disabled veteran of U.S. Army, serving in World War II, past commander of the VFW Post in Cromwell, member of the American Legion Post, Cromwell, the Liberty Baptist Church; and Centennial Lodge, No. 118 AF & AM, New Britain. Among his survivors are his wife, Jean (Noyes) Walentukonis of Plainville; a son, Peter Walentukonis of Plainville; two daughters, Linda Beveridge of Bristol, and Bonnie Walentukonis of Hartford; a brother, Anthony Walentukonis of Berlin; four sisters, Mary Bombara of Hartford, Margaret Weber and Julie Walentukonis, both of New Britain, and Nellie Kelly of Plainville; and two grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the Bailey Funeral Home, 48 Broad St. Burial will be in Fairview Cemetery, New Britain, with full military honors. Calling hours are tomorrow from 7 to 9 p.m. Contributions in his memory may be made to the Disabled American Veterans of Cromwell.)
 
WALENTUKONIS William Jonathan (I115400)
 
118
(Noyes - Distin Wedding
Raymond A. Noyes and Miss Priscilla M. Distin were married at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon by Rev. Arthur A. Ball, pastor of Plainville M.E. Church. They were attended by Samuel J. Farr and Miss Jean Cassidy.)
 
Family F46502
 
119
(OBIT: FRANCES M. NOYES
AGE 95 YEARS

Frances M. (Hall) Noyes of Wallingford, wife of the late Evan A. Noyes, passed away January 10, 2017 at Masonicare, Wallingford, CT.

Survived by her daughter, Sandra Nelson and her husband Vernon of Wallingford, CT; daughter-in-law, Christine Noyes of Tewksbury, MA; grandchildren, Robert Nelson (Maria), David Nelson (Mary), Scott Noyes (Linda), and Douglas Noyes (Denise); 7 great-grandchildren and 1 great-great grandson.

She was predeceased by her son Robert Noyes.
Funeral services and burial in Union Cemetery, Amesbury will be private.

Published in The Boston Globe on Jan. 15, 2017)
 
HALL Frances Marjorie (I23374)
 
120
(OBIT: FUNK - In this city, February 11, 1986 Mrs. Renna Belle (Noyes) Funk, widow of Arthur J. Funk of 561 Clintonville Road, North Haven, formerly of South Brooksvale Road, Cheshire, aged 100 Private funeral services will be held Friday at Kelly-Brennan Funeral Home, 768 Baldwin Street, Waterbury. Burial will be in Woodlawn Cemetery, Freeport, Maine in the spring. There are no calling hours.)
 
NOYES Rena Belle (I37296)
 
121
(OBIT: JOB K. PIKE, one of Caribou's oldest and most highly respected citizens, died at his home on Fenderson street Tuesday of last week. He has been in failing health for several years, and for the past eight months has been confined to his bed. The immediate cause of his death, however, was pneumonia, which developed the Friday before his demise.

Mr. Job Pike was born in Fryeburg, ME, in 1849 and was the second son of John T. and Amanda Pike, who were among the early settlers of this town. When a small boy he came to Caribou with his parents, settled on the farm on the Presque Isle road, now owned by Mr. H.T. Fletcher. In 1874 he was married to Miss Lillian Harris of Maysville, who with four children survive him. Mr. Pike was a great lover of music and played several instruments. He was a good mechanic and for years conducted a repair shop on South Main Street. He was extremely fond of children, and one of his greatest delights in his declining years was to hear the innocent prattle of childhood.

Funeral services were held at his late home, Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. E.A. Trites of the Baptist church officiating. A duet was sung by Mrs. Perely Merrithew and Mrs. Wm. Thomas.

The deceased was a consistent member of the Baptist church. He was an honest, upright citizen, and commanded the respect of all, and in his demise the town has lost a valuable citizen.

Mr. Pike leaves to mourn their loss his wife, four children, Mrs. Bessie P. McWethy and Arthur Pike of Liverpool, NY; Harold T. Pike of Duntown and Miss Alma Pike of this town, who have the sympathy of their many friends.)
 
PIKE Job Knight (I52648)
 
122
(OBIT: LILLIAN PIKE. Mrs. Pike was born in Gloucester, Maine, on October 3, 1855. Her girlhood years were passed in Maysville, and on March 2, 1874, she married Job K. Pike, at that time a resident of Malden, Mass. In 1879 they moved to Caribou, which has since been their home.

Mrs. Pike was for many years a devoted member and an earnest, consistent worker of the Baptist church in Caribou. From the time of its organization, through all the years of her Christian life, until hindered by ill health, the welfare, growth in spirituality and strength of the church was always upon her heart and she spared no effort to promote its helpfulness and influences for good to all.

Faithful in attendance at the prayer room, her presence was always an inspiration to others. In the women's work, both in the missionary effort and all work of the church, her judgement and discretion in guidance was of inestimable value. Her life was a living testimony of faith in Christ, sober and faithful in all things, ready to admonish and direct the younger women to Godly living and constancy in faith and charity.

Of her it is fitting to say "She hath done what she could." To her "The day has come, not gone, the sun has risen, not set, her life now beyond the reach of death and change, not ended but begun."

She died May 19, 1926, at the age of 70 years. Funeral services were held at her home on May 22, the Rev. C.E. Young of Hallowell, Maine, who for many years was pastor of the Caribou Baptist church, officiating. A wealth of lovely flowers bore mute testimony of the respect, love and sympathy of many friends.

"The Sweet Bye and Bye," "Asleep In Jesus," and "We're Going Home," all hymns which she loved, were beautifully sung by the United Baptist Male Quartet, composed of Eugene Hale, Clyde Morgan, Warren Ellingwood and James Miller, with Mrs. Louise Kidney at the piano.

We rejoice in our assurance that what seems from this side of the mists that blind us here, to the death, is, to those passing, only the realization of perfect and eternal Life and Love.

Job K. Pike, her husband of 50 years, died in 1924. She is survived by two daughters: Bessie L. McWethy of Liverpool, NY; Alma L. Pike of Caribou; two sons: Arthur W. Pike of Liverpool, NY and Harold T. Pike of Caribou. Interment, Caribou Evergreen Cemetery.)
 
HARRIS Lillian Cammette (I52650)
 
123
(OBIT: Mrs. J.M. Jacobs Dies In Eighty-Second Year

Funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon for Mrs. J.M. Jacobs, 82, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Hattie Chandler, Teague Street.

Mrs. Jacobs, who had a slight shock a week ago, passed away early on Sunday morning.

Born in Ashland on March 7, 1861, she married the late James Jacobs of this town at the age of 22 and came to Caribou 58 years ago to live on the present Edgar Russ farm on the Washburn Road, where her husband was engaged in farming.

In 1909 the couple moved to Caribou, where she has lived ever since, spending the last five years with her daughter, Mrs. S.H. Chandler.

Rev. D. Stanley Rawson was in charge of the funeral services.

Pallbearers were her four grandsons, Philip, Irving and Frederick Jacobs and Ernest Staples.

Mrs. Jacobs had eight children; John and Frederick Jacobs (deceased), Mrs. Maude Currier, Mrs. Hattie Chandler, Del and Warren Jacobs, Mrs. Frank Cheney of Sacremento, California, and Mrs. Alice Cheney of Temple City, California.

She is also survived by 24 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren.

Interment was at the family lot at Evergreen Cemetery.)
 
ALLEN Ada B. (I108728)
 
124
(OBIT: New Sweden - Hollis Jacobs, 64, died unexpectedly at his New Sweden home March 3.

A native of Washburn, he was born Jan. 8, 1913, the son of John and Annie (Pike) Jacobs. He lived most of his life in Caribou and moved to New Sweden five years ago. He was associated with the furniture business many years, was a member of the Faith Lutheran Church in Caribou and was a past member of the Caribou Rotary Club.

He is survived by his wife, Wilma (Bengston) Jacobs of New Sweden; a son, Marvin Jacobs of New Sweden; a daughter, Mrs. Philip (Cynthia) Gulliver of Houlton; a brother, Philip Jacobs of San Antonio, Tex.; two sisters, Mrs. Clara Jacobs of Brunswick and Mrs. Ernest (Alda) Staples of Raymond, N.H., and five grandchildren.

Funeral services were March 6 at Lancaster-Morgan Funeral Home of Caribou with the Rev. Edwin Druckenmiller officiating. Interment was at Evergreen Cemetery in Caribou.

Pallbearers were Wendell Christiansen, Ernest Murphy, Burton Smith, Leo Davenport, Phil Gulliver and Melvin Nelson.

Musical selections were "Whispering Hope" and "God Understands," sung by Mrs. Carl V. Anderson and Karla Anderson.)
 
JACOBS Hollis Linwood (I1294)
 
125
(OBIT: Services set Tuesday for Raymond Noyes, longtime resident PLAINVILLE

Funeral services for Raymond A. Noyes, 83, of 31 Washington St., will be held Tuesday at 11 a.m. at the United Methodist Church, Red Stone Hill. Mr. Noyes died at Mary Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, N.H., Wednesday. Burial will be in West Cemetery. Born in Freeport, Maine, July 9, 1904, son of the late William A. and Anna Elzade (Noyes) Noyes, he was the husband of Priscilla (Distin) Noyes. He had been a resident of Plainville most of his life. Before retiring in 1969, he had worked at the Travelers Insurance Cos., Hartford, for 46 years. He was a member of the United Methodist Church and the Plainville Senior Citizens Center. In addition to his wife, he leaves a son, Russell Noyes of Guild, N.H.; a daughter, Jean Walentukonis of Plainville; nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by a son, Bruce Noyes. Calling hours will be Monday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Bailey Funeral Home, 48 Broad St. Contributions may be made to the Plainville Senior Citizens Center, 200 East St.)
 
NOYES Raymond Augustas (I37285)
 
126
(OBIT: William A. Noyes, 78, Dies Unexpectedly PLAINVILLE

William A. Noyes, 78, of 150 Milford St. Ext., died suddenly at his home this morning. Born in Portland, Maine, he had lived in Plainville for the past 28 years. He was employed at the Trumbull Electric Co. before retiring a few years ago. He leaves a son, Raymond A. Noyes, of Plainville; a brother, the Rev. Henry Noyes of Worcester, Mass., four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge in Freeport, Maine. Friends may call at the Bailey Funeral Home tomorrow evening. Funeral arraingments are incomplete.)
 
NOYES William Augustus (I6446)
 
127
(on each census through 1940 they are listed as single, living at separate addresses, however, on Russell's 1941 World War II Draft Registration Card, he lists Miss Madeline P. Goodwin, Danbury, Conn. as the "person who will always know your address." They share a gravestone where she is listed as his wife so they must have married after 1941.)
 
Family F29737
 
128
(PLAINVILLE - Jean Anna (Noyes) Walentukonis, 77, of Plainville, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2006 at New Britain General Hospital. She was the wife of the late William Walentukonis who was a decorated WWII veteran. Jean was born Aug. 19, 1929 in New Britain, to the late Raymond and Priscilla (Distin) Noyes. Jean graduated from Plainville High School in 1947 and remained an active member, attending the reunions and getting together with her high school friends. She went on to meet her husband in the hospital as he came back from WWII, after sustaining injuries from his service. She started her family and had the help of her children by her side as she went through a physically challenging period of her life. Jean was a sport enthusiast and enjoyed watching wrestling and Hulk Hogan throw his opponents around the ring. She loved baseball especially the Red Sox and she was a fan of boxing, including Muhammad Ali. Jean also enjoyed watching the Food Network Channel, especially Rachael Ray. Jean enjoyed sharing memories and stories such as when she was a teenager one of the times she went to Hampton Beach she met Marlon Brando and had coffee with him. When she was able, she was a part of the Junior Women's Club and the Junior Republican's Club. Most of all she loved her family and would take the time to see her brother as much as she could. Jean is survived by her son, Peter Walentukonis of Plainville; her daughter, Linda Catucci of Bristol; her grandchildren, Michael A. McClellan of Southington, Marcus A. McClellan of Bristol and Thomas Gromak of East Windsor; her great-grandchildren, Marcus A. Cyr of Bristol and Laura E. Cyr of Bristol; her brother, Russell Noyes of Omaha, Ariz.; her sisters-in-law, Nellie Kelly of Plainville, Julia Walentukonis of New Britain, Mary Bombara of Hartford and Agnes Walentukonis of Berlin; and several nieces, nephews, cousins, neighbors and friends. Besides her husband, she was predeceased by her daughter, Bonnie Lee Walentukonis and a brother, Bruce Noyes. Funeral services will be held Monday, Nov. 13, with a Mass of Christian burial at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Mercy Church. Burial will follow in Fairview Cemetery in New Britain. Her pallbearers are Patrick Kelly, Russell Anderson, Daniel Walentukonis, James Weber, Michael McClellan and Marcus A. Cyr. Family and friends may gather Sunday from 5 to 7 p.m. at Bailey Funeral Home, 48 Broad St., Plainville. Memorial contributions in Jean's name may be made to the Alzheimer's Association Connecticut Chapter, 279 New Britain Road, Kensington, CT 06037 and to the New Britain General Hospital, Traumatic Brain Injury Center, 100 Grand St., New Britain, CT 06050. For directions and online condolences please visit www.bailey-funeralhome.com.)
 
NOYES Jean Anna (I115399)
 
129
"In the Proceedings of the Maine Historical Society, 2nd Series, Vol. III, pages 281-290, there is an entire chapter about Samuel Skillings. He was an Indian fighter, sawmill tender, innkeeper, farmer, and office holder. Captain Samuel Skillings' command in the French and Indian War are listed on page 289. Among the soldiers are two of his sons, Josiah and Samuel. In 1792, Samuel Skillings Jr. was the representative of the Skillings family in Portland, Maine and the vicinity when an extraordinary lease was made. The other party in the agreement, Enoch Ilsey, was one of the most prominent landowners and dealers in real estate in the town. The lease concerned a seven-acre tract belonging to Samuel Skillings, which lay in the vicinity of what is known as Market Square. The [lease] document is on record at the Cumberland registry of deeds, and runs as follows: 'This indenture of lease made and concluded upon this tenth day of April, Anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and Ninety-Two, by and between Samuel Skillings of the District of Cape Elizabeth in the County of Cumberland, gentleman of the one part, and Enock Ilsey, of Portland in the County aforesaid, merchant, of the other part, witnesseth: That the said Samuel Skillings, for himself and in behalf of the other heirs of his father, deceased, for the consideration hereinafter mentioned, hath leased and to farm letten, and by these presents doth lease and farm let, unto him the said Enock, his heirs and assigns, all the land lying between ye southwesterly part of the County Coal yard, and the southwesterly part of the hay scales, and between Back Street and Middle Street in the said town of Portland, where one Captain Joseph Bailey now dwells, and who has been a tenant at will under us many years past, and now hires the house on said land of the aforesaid Enock Ilsey, for the full term of ninety-nine years from the date hereof, to be fully completed, to improve as he, the said Enock, his heirs or assigns, may think proper, or build and erect any buildings he may think proper, and improve them as he chooses for and during the term of time aforesaid. And the said Enock Ilsey doth covenant and engage to pay to the said Samuel Skillings, for himself and the other heirs aforesaid, one dollar per year yearly for the rent of said land, and at the expiration of said term of ninety-nine years, to yield and deliver unto the said Samuel and the other heirs aforesaid, quiet and peaceable possession of said lands and all the buildings thereon, provided he or they pay the said Enock his heirs or assigns, as much moneyas three indifferent men may judge said buildings to be worth when delivered up at the end of ninety-nine years. To the truye performance of each and every article aforementioned, the parties bind themselves, their heirs, executors, and administrators, each to the other in the penal sum of thirty pounds. In witness whereof they have hereunto set their hands and seals this day and year aforementioned. Witnesses: Simeon Skillings Enoch Ilsey [seal] Jospeh Skillings Samuel Skillin [seal] In 1889, the heirs of Samuel Skillings Jr. attempted to organize a league to sue the city of Portland to return to them this valuable piece of downtown property when the lease would expire in 1891. However, it became too complicated to trace all the heirs, and a lawsuit was never established. Captian Samuel Skillings Jr. died at Long Creek, Cape Elizabeth, Maine March 12, 1799, at the age of ninety-one years. He is buried in an old cow psature at long creek." 
Capt. SKILLINGS Samuel (I70344)
 
130
(age 69 ys 3 ms 25 d)
 
PHILLIPS Hannah Rebecca (I99788)
 
131
(Here Lies Buried
The Body of Mr
Jonathan Kimball
Who died Sept
The 30h 1749
And in the
76h Year of
his age)
 
KIMBALL Jonathan (I24831)
 
132
(OBIT: Barefoot Bay, Fla. and Caribou, Maine. Graveside committal services for John Philip Jacobs, 74, will be held at Castle Hill Cemetery, Castle Hill, 2 p.m. Saturday, June 20, 1992 with the Rev. Douglas Williams officiating.)
 
JACOBS John Philip (I1295)
 
133
(OBIT: Mrs. Anna E. Noyes, 74, Dies at Home; Resident 26 Years Native of Maine; Served as Chaplain Of Grange Plainville, Dec 7 -

Mrs. Anna E. Noyes, 74, died early this morning at her home, 150 Milford Street Extension. Born in Yarmouth, Me., she was a resident of Plainville for the past 26 years. She was a member of Plainville Grange for 25 years, serving as chaplain for 22 years, and was also a member of Federation Chapter, No. 110, O.E.S. (Order of Eastern Star) Mrs. Noyes is survived by her husband William A. Noyes; one son, Raymond A. Noyes; one daughter, Mrs. Charles Weldon, all of this town; two sisters, Mrs. Arthur Funk of Plainville and Mrs. Jessie L. Haley of Auburn, Me., four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral arrangements are incomplete and are in charge of the Bailey Funeral Home. Friends may call at the funeral home on Sunday after 2 p.m. The Easter Star will hold a service at the funeral home Sunday at 7 p.m.)
 
NOYES Anna Elzade (I37283)
 
134
A Memory of Marjorie (Morgan) Wyman by Freeman Wright:

Marjorie (Morgan) Wyman was born Jan. 24, 1925 in Caribou
The daughter of Clyde and Blanche (Pike) Morgan
The Morgans were a very talented and musical family
Who spent many Sundays and evenings around the piano & organ

Clyde & Blanche Morgan were blessed with four daughters
Named: Arlene, Regna, Ruth and Marjorie
Clyde Morgan their Dad was a prominent businessman
Who left an indelible mark on Caribou's early history

Marjorie's father was part owner, of Morgan's Funeral Home
The first to be established in Caribou, the year 1898
Which is now known as the Lancaster-Morgan Funeral Home
A prominent & respected funeral home, from that early date

Clyde & Blanche were active members, of the United Baptist Church
Their girls were also active, becoming members one by one
Ruth is the only remaining active member, at this time
They were all quiet and friendly girls, known by everyone

Marjorie was always a pleasant person to talk to
Which is a characteristic of Marjorie and her sisters as well
It was a trait they inherited from their mother
As those that knew Blanche (Pike) Morgan, will tell

Marjorie attended the grammar schools in Caribou
Graduated from Caribou High School in 1942
She graduated with Rex Wyman, whom she would later marry
They met at a birthday for Marjorie, that Rex was invited to

After graduating, Marjorie worked for the Potato Inspection Office
Rex went into the United States Air Force in 1943
Later after receiving his training, Rex was sent to England
He was assigned to B-24's in England, serving his country

Rex was sent home just before the war was over in Germany
He was given a thirty day furlough after returning home
Was stationed at Pratt AFB in Kansas, when they were married
Rex was reassigned to the Pacific, where he was later flown

They were married in the living room of Marjorie's parents
Her sister Dorothy's wedding also took place in their home
Marjorie was the last of the Morgan girls to be married
For the first time in years, Clyde & Blanche were now alone

Rex was sent by the Air Force to serve in the Pacific
While stationed there, Rex was assigned to B-29's
It was from a B-29 that the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan
Which brought an end to the Pacific conflict, in a short time

Rex returned to the United States, after the war was over
Was discharged from Fort Devens in 1946, returning home
For Marjorie and the Wyman family, there was a sigh of relief
Especially for Marjorie, who would no longer be alone

Rex and Marjorie built a house, on Page Avenue extension
Actually Marjorie lived on Page Avenue, all of her life
It was there she was born, at the home of her parents
Grew up, went to school, married, becoming a devoted wife

Rex worked for awhile, in the A&P Grocery Store
Then worked for Gradon Lombard for 12 & 1/2 years
Went on his own, repairing and rewinding electric motors
His electrical expertise was well known, by all his peers

God blessed Rex & Marjorie with a daughter "Gail" Oct. 23, 1948
It was "Melissa" April 4, 1952 when God blessed them once more
If they were praying for a son, their prayers were answered
With the birth of a son "Scott", who was born July 21, 1954

Marjorie no longer worked for the Potato Inspection Office
Her place as a good mother, was with her children at home
Her children remember her love and "tender loving care"
From the time they were born, until they were fully grown

Marjorie and Rex had a place for relaxing on hot summer days
They built a camp for themselves & the children at Madawaska Lake
They spent much time there, while the children were growing up
The cool water on a hot summer day, wasn't hard to take

Marjorie went to the old hospital for an operation in 1957
Her sister Regna has broken a leg and was also admitted there
The hospital placed them together, to share the same room
Making their stay more enjoyable, their burdens easier to bear

Marjorie and Rex enjoyed traveling after the children were married
They made many trips to visit their daughters, who had moved away
Especially during the times, their husbands were in the service
Those trips leave precious memories, Rex & the girls share today

They were fortunate to have their son Scott, remain in Caribou
He, his wife Elizabeth and children, are still living here
Melissa also lived nearby, before moving to Greenville, Maine
Marjorie kept in touch with them all, down through the years

Marjorie accepted the Lord at an early age
Became a member of the United Baptist Church of Caribou
Marjorie was baptised April 12, 1936
In the old chapel baptismal, that her sisters went through

God gave Marjorie a good and loving husband
To Rex, Marjorie was a loving and devoted wife
She loved her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren
They meant so much to Marjorie, they were her life!

Marjorie not only said she loved her children, but showed it
She remained in contact with them, even after they were grown
That same love carried on and wa extended to others in need
Through cards, notes and meals, from their home

Marjorie's son Scott said: "Mom was the nicest lady I ever met
She was not only nice to her family, but nice to all"
Marjorie displayed a pleasant attitude, to everyone she met
In her home, love and kindness was shared, to all who called

Marjorie was born and brought up, in a good Christian home
She and her three sisters, were a "close knit" family
They made it a point, to meet often after they were married
They now have children of their own and their own "family tree"

One of Marjorie's most enjoyable hobbies, was playing bridge
She was faithful to a group of ladies, who met every week
I remember seeing them often, meeting at Yusef's Restaurant
Enjoying a time of fellowship and something to eat

Marjorie enjoyed playing the piano in her home
Sharing her musical talent, a carry over from the Morgan family
Marjorie made everyone feel good, by just talking with her
Something about Marjorie, brought out the good in everybody

Those that knew Marjorie, could see the love of God through her
Her faith in God, was recognized by all whom she met
A faith recognized, by her attributes and character
Her smile and "soft spoken voice", we shall never forget!

Marjorie suffered much, the last few weeks of her life
She was in and out of the hospital, here and in Bangor, Maine
She now has a perfect life, a perfect body & in a perfect place
A place where we are promised, there will be no more "suffering or pain" 
MORGAN Marjorie Lillian (I28998)
 
135
A Memory of Marjorie (Morgan) Wyman by Freeman Wright:

Marjorie (Morgan) Wyman was born Jan. 24, 1925 in Caribou
The daughter of Clyde and Blanche (Pike) Morgan
The Morgans were a very talented and musical family
Who spent many Sundays and evenings around the piano & organ

Clyde & Blanche Morgan were blessed with four daughters
Named: Arlene, Regna, Ruth and Marjorie
Clyde Morgan their Dad was a prominent businessman
Who left an indelible mark on Caribou's early history

Marjorie's father was part owner, of Morgan's Funeral Home
The first to be established in Caribou, the year 1898
Which is now known as the Lancaster-Morgan Funeral Home
A prominent & respected funeral home, from that early date

Clyde & Blanche were active members, of the United Baptist Church
Their girls were also active, becoming members one by one
Ruth is the only remaining active member, at this time
They were all quiet and friendly girls, known by everyone

Marjorie was always a pleasant person to talk to
Which is a characteristic of Marjorie and her sisters as well
It was a trait they inherited from their mother
As those that knew Blanche (Pike) Morgan, will tell

Marjorie attended the grammar schools in Caribou
Graduated from Caribou High School in 1942
She graduated with Rex Wyman, whom she would later marry
They met at a birthday for Marjorie, that Rex was invited to

After graduating, Marjorie worked for the Potato Inspection Office
Rex went into the United States Air Force in 1943
Later after receiving his training, Rex was sent to England
He was assigned to B-24's in England, serving his country

Rex was sent home just before the war was over in Germany
He was given a thirty day furlough after returning home
Was stationed at Pratt AFB in Kansas, when they were married
Rex was reassigned to the Pacific, where he was later flown

They were married in the living room of Marjorie's parents
Her sister Dorothy's wedding also took place in their home
Marjorie was the last of the Morgan girls to be married
For the first time in years, Clyde & Blanche were now alone

Rex was sent by the Air Force to serve in the Pacific
While stationed there, Rex was assigned to B-29's
It was from a B-29 that the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan
Which brought an end to the Pacific conflict, in a short time

Rex returned to the United States, after the war was over
Was discharged from Fort Devens in 1946, returning home
For Marjorie and the Wyman family, there was a sigh of relief
Especially for Marjorie, who would no longer be alone

Rex and Marjorie built a house, on Page Avenue extension
Actually Marjorie lived on Page Avenue, all of her life
It was there she was born, at the home of her parents
Grew up, went to school, married, becoming a devoted wife

Rex worked for awhile, in the A&P Grocery Store
Then worked for Gradon Lombard for 12 & 1/2 years
Went on his own, repairing and rewinding electric motors
His electrical expertise was well known, by all his peers

God blessed Rex & Marjorie with a daughter "Gail" Oct. 23, 1948
It was "Melissa" April 4, 1952 when God blessed them once more
If they were praying for a son, their prayers were answered
With the birth of a son "Scott", who was born July 21, 1954

Marjorie no longer worked for the Potato Inspection Office
Her place as a good mother, was with her children at home
Her children remember her love and "tender loving care"
From the time they were born, until they were fully grown

Marjorie and Rex had a place for relaxing on hot summer days
They built a camp for themselves & the children at Madawaska Lake
They spent much time there, while the children were growing up
The cool water on a hot summer day, wasn't hard to take

Marjorie went to the old hospital for an operation in 1957
Her sister Regna has broken a leg and was also admitted there
The hospital placed them together, to share the same room
Making their stay more enjoyable, their burdens easier to bear

Marjorie and Rex enjoyed traveling after the children were married
They made many trips to visit their daughters, who had moved away
Especially during the times, their husbands were in the service
Those trips leave precious memories, Rex & the girls share today

They were fortunate to have their son Scott, remain in Caribou
He, his wife Elizabeth and children, are still living here
Melissa also lived nearby, before moving to Greenville, Maine
Marjorie kept in touch with them all, down through the years

Marjorie accepted the Lord at an early age
Became a member of the United Baptist Church of Caribou
Marjorie was baptised April 12, 1936
In the old chapel baptismal, that her sisters went through

God gave Marjorie a good and loving husband
To Rex, Marjorie was a loving and devoted wife
She loved her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren
They meant so much to Marjorie, they were her life!

Marjorie not only said she loved her children, but showed it
She remained in contact with them, even after they were grown
That same love carried on and wa extended to others in need
Through cards, notes and meals, from their home

Marjorie's son Scott said: "Mom was the nicest lady I ever met
She was not only nice to her family, but nice to all"
Marjorie displayed a pleasant attitude, to everyone she met
In her home, love and kindness was shared, to all who called

Marjorie was born and brought up, in a good Christian home
She and her three sisters, were a "close knit" family
They made it a point, to meet often after they were married
They now have children of their own and their own "family tree"

One of Marjorie's most enjoyable hobbies, was playing bridge
She was faithful to a group of ladies, who met every week
I remember seeing them often, meeting at Yusef's Restaurant
Enjoying a time of fellowship and something to eat

Marjorie enjoyed playing the piano in her home
Sharing her musical talent, a carry over from the Morgan family
Marjorie made everyone feel good, by just talking with her
Something about Marjorie, brought out the good in everybody

Those that knew Marjorie, could see the love of God through her
Her faith in God, was recognized by all whom she met
A faith recognized, by her attributes and character
Her smile and "soft spoken voice", we shall never forget!

Marjorie suffered much, the last few weeks of her life
She was in and out of the hospital, here and in Bangor, Maine
She now has a perfect life, a perfect body & in a perfect place
A place where we are promised, there will be no more "suffering or pain" 
MORGAN Marjorie Lillian (I477)
 
136
After the death of his mother, he seems to have been somewhat seperated from the rest of the family but to have been well cared for by his Aunt Blanche Morgan (Pike) for seven years.

During September, 1978, Allen Pike visited with Hollis and Wilma Jacobs at their home in New Sweden, Maine and Hollis recalled much about his family. The conversation was tape recorded and in later months transcribed by Allen Pike. The following are some of the remarks from that conversation:

"I was seven when my Dad died (1920) and I was eleven when Mother died (1924). Mother and Dad were the same age. Dad was thirty-five and Mother died four years later when she was thirty-nine.

We lived on the Washburn Road about four miles from Caribou. It was just below the hill from the Tuttle farm.

Jimmy (James) Jacobs, Dad's father owned a considerable amount of land around Caribou and Washburn. This included large acerage around the Caribou Lake area where Fred Jacobs lived. Grandfather Jimmy Jacobs divided his land between John, my father, and uncle Fred. Father got the farm on the Washburn Road and Fred got the farm on the Caribou Lake Road. Grandfather also owned land in Woodland. In later years grandfather moved into the village of Caribou and lived on Teague Street. He lived to be around 85 or 88 years of age. I recall as a child that Grandfather would come out to the farm and help Dad with the farming.

In later years I had several conversations with my Grandfather. He said he paid as much as seventy-five cents an acre for a lot. He thought that was high. [Ed. note: Land was held by the State and sold for 25 cents per acre, one-half payable in work on the State roads.]

We went to a one-room school which was located up the road from our house. We drove a horse and sleigh to school in the cold weather. It was a covered wagon or covered sled. We would leave the horse at Ed Rider's who lived across the road from the school.

I was in the fifth grade when Mother died. She had a heart condition. We were in school the day she died and they came and got us. You know what actually happened?

A hen had come in out of the barn, you see, we had that nice shed and the hen was determined to set there where she didn't belong. Mother had this darn basket and she was moving this darn hen back into the barn. This shed was connected to the barn along this walkway. There were steps which went up to a sort of attic over the shed where odds and ends were kept. When they found her she was three or four steps up there just sitting on the steps where she died.

These were very hard times for the farmers. Potatoes on which they depended for their livelihood were selling from fifteen to twenty five cents a barrel.

After the death of our parents the children went to live with relatives and friends."

Hollis' conversation continues with considerable information about his sisters and brother.


 
JACOBS Hollis Linwood (I1294)
 
137
Annie's father had moved his family from Caribou to Van Buren about 1881. At the time of her birth she had two half-brothers, Sylvesster and Judson and two half-sisters, Minnie (Melinda) and Addie by her father's first wife Caroline (Rideout). Her first sister, Nellie, who was also born in Van Buren, died after four years of age. Hiram, her father, was a "manufacturer of and dealer in carriages and sleighs." He had tried farming on the Brown Road, Woodland, Maine before moving north to Van Buren.

It was in these surroundings along the St. John River that Annie began her life. Shortly, after her brother Eugene Hale was born in 1887, the family moved back to Caribou and Hiram, the father, purchased a farm on the Caribou-Washburn Road near the Bailey Mitchell Bridge. In later years the farm was referred to as "The Noble Farm." Records indicate that Hiram didn't keep the farm very long. He then returned to his old profession, that of being a carpenter.

On the farm Annie was to enjoy the company of more brothers and sister: Blanche Hazel, William Merritt, Charles Boutelle and Jennie Bernice. The family was to enjoy the rural country living until 1900 when the mother died (May, 1900). At this time Annie would have been sixteen years of age. Being one of the older girls, she assisted in keeping house for one or two years when she went to Lowell, Massachusetts to seek work in the textile mills. She joined her half-sister Addie, who was already working there.

Annie returned to Caribou after four years and on 28 November 1905 she married John Jacobs. His family lived on the Washburn Road. John was born in Readfield, Maine on 21 May 1884 the son of James Monroe Jacobs. John and Annie went to live on the "Jacobs Farm" on the Caribou-Washburn Road.

On their farm four children were born: Clara Alice, Alda Blanche, Hollis Linwood and John Philip.

John Jacobs, the father, died 6 February 1920 at the age of 35. Annie remarried February 1922, George Lawson. George was born in 1888 at Andover, N.B., Canada. They continued to live on the farm. However, this was not to last for very long; two years later Annie died on 10 April 1924 at the age of 39. The uncertanties of the crops and other complications which they could not control brought them into financial difficulties and it is probable that this trouble brought on the heart attack from which she died. The date of her death was also the date for foreclosing on the farm. George Lawson moved to Massachusetts and later to Deerfield, Florida where he died November 1956.

She was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star.

With the father and mother dying at such early ages, their children had little recollection of them. However, during September, 1978, Allen Pike visited with Hollis and Wilma Jacobs at their home in New Sweden, Maine and Hollis recalled much about his family. The conversation was tape recorded and in later months transcribed by Allen Pike. Remarks from that conversation can be found as a general note on Hollis Jacob's page.

Of all the grandchildren of Hiram Pike, Jr., this family perhaps suffered the greatest loss. In later years, taking into consideration their many trials and tribulations, they all did well.

Clara Jacobs also contributed a piece in 1976 which can be found on her page.
 
PIKE Annie Burpee (I1283)
 
138
Appears on the muster roll of Capt Ninan Aiken's Company in Col Daniel Moore's Regiment of Militia. Bond Little, private, was one of the men who marched from Deering to Ackworth for the assistance of the American Army at Fort Ticonderoga on the first of July 1777 and returned on the 3rd of the same month.

A payroll of Capt William Boyes's company of volunteers in Col Kelly's Regiment in the expedition to Rhode Island Aug 1778 shows that Bond Little served as Corporal, date of the enlistment Aug 7, 1778, date of discharge Aug 27, 1778. Time of service 23 days, 2 days travel.
 
Corp. LITTLE Bond (I73764)
 
139
Autobiographical comments (1980):

"I recall very little about my parents as my father died when I was two and my mother when I was six years of age. After our parents died our family lived with Uncle Clyde and Aunt Blanche Morgan. Alda and Clara lived with different people. I was raised by Edgar and Lena (Hardison) Russ in Caribou. Lena and Edgar were wonderful people. I was educated at Caribou schools, Hebron Academy and two years at the University of Maine, Orono.

At the time I lived with the Russ family they were raising about 500 acres of potatoes. This was the time before mechanical tractors and trucks and the work was done with horses. I spent thirty years in agriculture, raising, buying and selling potatoes before quitting at the age of 50.

We moved to Louisiana in 1973 and I went to work at the Beverly Dinner Playhouse, partially owned and operated by my wife Betty's brother, Frank Storer Boone. It was very successful. Betty was Office Manager and I was Food Director. Our daughter Joy was also born there."

Lived in San Antonio, Texas. Came home ill to visit in 1991 and died two days later. After the death of his mother, the home was broken up. The step father doing something to secure the safety of the children. Lived with his father's sister, Maud Currier for a year, then with Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Russ.
 
JACOBS John Philip (I1295)
 
140
Bessie graduated from Caribou High School in 1894, In 1907 she studied photography in Caribou. She went to Syracuse, 7 Aug 1911.
 
PIKE Bessie Lillian (I52653)
 
141
Children born in El Paso, Wis., Rush City and Warren, Minn.

He was a Federal Customs Agent and the government named the town of Noyes, Minnesota after him.
 
NOYES James Archibald (I6951)
 
142
Clara, writing in 1976: "When my father was four his family moved to Washburn. That is a storey that might make a good novel someday. Grover Cleveland was president and the country was in the worst depression we ever had. So anyone who could left southern Maine. When Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Blackstone came there they bought land from father."

Clara was never married.
 
JACOBS Clara Alice (I1292)
 
143
George was a long-time friend, caretaker, and manager of Dr. Samuel Bemis's farm, saw mill, and property, which included his granite mansion now known as The Notchland Inn. He inherited it all from Dr. Bemis when he died in 1881. When George died in 1902 he left it all to his minor son, Charles.

When George died in 1902 they were living in Portland, ME where he was a lumber merchant. The property he inherited had included a sawmill. After his son George married in 1906 he and his wife, Florence, took over the Bemis property.

George died of Meningitis and was brought home to be buried in this cemetery on his property. He was preceded in death by his parents and his two young sons, Georgie and Freddie.

[Shirley Mitchell - Find A Grave]
 
MOREY George H. (I14533)
 
144
Hannah was born in West Gwillimbury, Simcoe, Ontario, Canada to William Phillips and Hannah Patterson. Her husband Thomas West left her one day to go off with the neighbor lady. So the story goes. And apparently, everyone in the family was put out by him. She never remarried.
 
PHILLIPS Hannah Rebecca (I99788)
 
145
He joined his father in the family stonecutting business sometime in 1809 or before (perhaps after he turned twenty-one in 1803), probably replacing his brother Enoch. After father, Paul Noyes, died, Robert continued for a time (he is mentioned as a "stone cutter" in two property transactions in 1811 and 1812), but ultimately also gave up stonecutting about 1815, judging from his gravestone production.

He later went to Maine, studied at Bowdoin College, became a minister and spent two years preaching to the congregation in Limington, Maine from 1821 to 1823. After his parishioners declined to retain him, he relocated sometime before 1836 to New Gloucester, Maine where both he and his wife died.

Robert's closure of his family's stonecutting shop was no doubt influenced by the fact that other, more competent stonecutters had established their own shops in the town, including Shubael Treat, Ebenezer Soule III, Moses Warren and Eliphalet Dame.
 
Rev. NOYES Robert Heath (I20968)
 
146
He was confused in the "Genealogical Record of Some of The Noyes Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes." Vol. I with Enoch, son of Samuel who died 30 Jan 1811. This Enoch died in 1832 at the age of 58 and his wife, Margaret administered his estate.

Enoch Noyes (1773 - 1832), son of stone engraver and carver Paul Noyes of Newburyport, produced tree and urn stones similar to those of his father and others. This type of stone is so standardized that it can only be attributed to a given carver when signed or probated.

While Enoch Noyes took over the lion's share of the gravestone production of the Noyes shop from about 1796, he also throughout this period and beyond ran a paint shop. He first advertised this shop in the "Newburyport Herald" in 1798. A similar advertisement appeared in 1799 and a later version in 1806. Enoch offered not only paint, but also "Sign, Chaise, and other Painting, Gilding and Varnishing." In the first two ads, his shop was "in Merrimack Street, just below Green street," while in the thirs ad, it was "in Union Street."

In 1807, he bought a house on Strong Street for $693 from Joshua and Elizabeth Carter.

In 1809, he appears to have yielded his role in the stonecutting shop to his younger brother Robert (who was twenty seven that year), for a notice in the "Newburyport Herald" in May of that year by Paul and Robert Noyes informed the public that a "new arrangement" had been made in their stonecutting business.

The situation changed again, of course, with the death of Paul Noyes in October of 1810. Enoch was appointed administrator in early November, but a few days before, he also placed a notice in the "Herald" advertising the sale of a house on Summer Street (which his father had bought three years earlier), two pews in the Meeting House, an assortment of Connecticut freestone and a "Shop-chamber in Union-street, suitable for a Cabinet-maker, or joiner." At the end of this ad, there is the notice: "N.B. Stone Cutting business carried on as usual by R.H. NOYES at the place lately occupied by his father." The house on Summer St. was sold in January of 1811 [Essex Co. Deeds: 193:185].

In October of 1811, Enoch sold his "share of my late father's estate" to his sister Sarah for $600 [196:26]. Yet in December of 1812, to cover a note for about $500, he and his siblings mortgaged the Noyes homestead to a Dorcas Noyes (who was probably their uncle Silas's widow). Had he mortgaged his share to his sister and then reaquired it?

In November of 1811, Enoch advertised a home for sale on Strong Street, "newly built" (as well as the two pews in the Meeting House). (Was this the same house he bought in 1808, or had he built a new one?) Enoch was apparently unable to sell this house, for in a notice in July of 1815, it was to be auctioned off. At the time he was still in debt for $365 on his house (Samuel Newman then held the mortgage, taken out in August of 1811; [194:237], as well as for an additional $123 on a mortgage on the same house held by a Paul Noyes of Salisbury, NH (not his father) originally taken out in October of 1811 [196:17], but re-mortgaged [?] to the same man 1812 [198:117]. It was perhaps David Patch who bought these two mortgages in the auction, for in December of 1815, Patch paid Enoch $1,250 for this property [208:259].

It appears that, after his father's death, Enoch had restructured his assets, as it were, buying and selling these properties (no doubt used as collateral for personal loans as well). In all these property transactions (one in 1807, two in 1811, three in 1812 and one in 1815), Enoch's occupation is "painter." In addition to his 1798, 1799 and 1806 advertisements for his paint shop, Enoch also put a notice in the "Herald" in March, 1811 about his runaway apprentice "to the painter's trade" Robert Griffith. The probate records for Enoch in 1832 and for his father in 1810 and 1813 all list Enoch as a painter as well.


 
NOYES Enoch (I72540)
 
147 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I86147)
 
148 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I685)
 
149 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I83655)
 
150 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I479)
 

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