NOYES Barker

NOYES Barker[1]

Male 1775 - 1863  (88 years)

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  • Name NOYES Barker 
    Born 13 Mar 1775  Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    • (DAR says 3 Mar 1775.)
    Gender Male 
    _UID 98950D38EB9ED5118A06444553540000A135 
    Died 14 Oct 1863  Norwich, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 7
    Notes 
    • Barker Noyes' immediate and extended family was intimately involved in the defense of Rhode Island during the War of the Revolution. Barker's father, Colonel Joseph Noyes was a representative from Westerly when the Rhode Island Declaration of Independence was approved in May 1776, months before the Continental Congress issued their Declaration. [1] He led the defense of Tower Hill in Narragansett. [2] Col. Noyes's house, located on Noyes Neck in modern Weekapaug, Westerly, was a temporary storehouse and armory. Col. Thomas Noyes, Barker's oldest brother who served under Capt Thomas Arnold in Col. Christopher Lippett's Regiment during the Revolution, also lived here during his lifetime. [3] Two other older brothers, Joseph Jr. and Sanford, were Revolutionary War soldiers. Sanford was only 15 when he enlisted and was assigned to carry dispatches in the Westerly area.

      [1] Denison, Frederic, "Westerly and its Witnesses", J.A. and R.A Reid, Providence, RI,1878, p 113.

      [2] Arnold, Samuel Greene, "History of the State of Rhode Island", Preston, Providence, RI, 1894, 389.

      [3] Field, Edward, "State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations at the End of the Century: A History," Vol. 3, The Mason Publishing Co., Boston, 1902, p 624.

      Barker, like his father and brothers after the Revolution, was primarily a farmer. He first appears in Westerly town records in May 1792 when he registered his earmark, "a Slope up under side the Right Ear and two half pennys under Left Ear," with the town clerk, similar to his father's earmark. [1]

      After the death of his father in 1802, Barker and his brothers, Thomas, Joseph Jr., Sanford, James and Joshua, each received a share of their father's farm. [2] Having received about 232 acres of land from his father's will, Barker now had a substantial farm of his own. His portion was described as "well-wooded and watered with never failing springs; is well adapted for dairy and for raising all kinds of grain“ with the most valuable priveledge [sic] of sea manure of any Farm in the County." [3] He applied for freeman's rights at a Westerly town council meeting 21 April 1804, along with two of his brothers, Dr. James Noyes and Joshua Noyes. [4] They were all then eligible for the voting privileges of freemen, which required freemen to be "of competent estate and civil conversation," were eligible to vote and hold office, and which was granted at another town meeting. [5]

      [1] Westerly, Rhode Island, Births, Marriages, Council and Earmarks, Book 4, p 410.

      [2] Westerly, Rhode Island, Council and Probate,Vol. 6, p 187, Probate of Estate of Col. Joseph Noyes; Town Clerk's Office,Westerly, RI. See also The Learning Company, "Vital Records: Rhode Island, 1500s-1900s" (Family Archive Viewer, CD 215;), "R.I.Genealogical Register," Vol. 9, No. 1, Abstracts Westerly Wills, p 53.

      [3] "Farm for Sale," "Newport Mercury," 7 Dec 1822, database online, America's Historical Newspapers, Newport, Rhode Island. (http://www.newsbank.com/readex/?content=96: accessed 3 Oct 2009) vol. LXI, issue 3165, p 3.

      [4] Westerly, Rhode Island, Town Meetings, Births, Marriages and Earmarks, No. 4, p199.

      [5] Description of requirements of freemen found in Field, Edward. "State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations at the End of the Century: A History Vol. 1". The Mason Publishing Co. Boston, 1902, p 112; and Rhode Island Historical Society website, (www.rihs.org : accessed 21 July 2011). Freeman status granted Westerly, Rhode Island, Town Meetings, Births,Marriages and Earmarks, No. 4, p 203.

      Barker was not solely a farmer. He had probably been educated at home, could read and write, and in the fall and winter of 1807 into 1808, Barker was an instructor in the Second School District of Westerly. [1] There were six school districts set up in September of 1800, [2] and the first schoolmaster at the Red School-house in 1800 was Jedediah Knight. [3] He was the first teacher, and later, a brother-in-law to Barker. He married Elizabeth Champlin, Margaret Champlin's sister. Additionally, in 1809, Dr. James Noyes, Barker's older brother had established a school in Hopkinton and boarded with Sanford Noyes. [4] James moved to Hopkinton where he farmed as well. [5]

      Barker probably lived at home until his marriage, along with perhaps his brothers James and Joshua. They are often recorded purchasing materials from the local store between 1795 and 1820, the years covered by the account book kept by Sanford Noyes. [6] Some of the purchases that they made over the years included sugar, and coffee and in 1800, silk handkerchiefs "bot [bought] in Boston." [7]

      [1] "Revolutionary War Pensions" images, "Fold3.com" (http://www.fold3.com: accessed 25 Feb 2012), Simeon West Pension file, Rhode Island, p 11, deposition by Barker Noyes, dated 10 April 1840, citing NARA M804. Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files.

      [2] Westerly, Rhode Island, "Town Council Records", Vol. 5, p 2-4.

      [3] Denison, Frederic, "Westerly and its Witnesses">, J.A. and R.A Reid, Providence, RI,1878 p 189.

      [4] Sanford Noyes Account Book, 1795-1820, p 83; Rhode Island Historical Society Library,Providence, Rhode Island.

      [5] Denison, Frederick, "Westerly and its Witnesses". 1889, p 206.

      [6] It is unclear if this account book was that of their uncle, Sanford Noyes, or their brother Sanford Noyes. Also, there were two account books attributed to Sanford Noyes, but only the first book is related here. The second book is in a slightly different hand, and it is unclear to the author whether they are, in fact, both Sanford Noyes' books.

      [7] Sanford Noyes Account Book, 1795-1820, p 15; Rhode Island Historical Society Library,Providence, Rhode Island.

      Their account was credited with pounds of fresh veal, mutton, beef, pork and hay. It is also clear that the three spent a bit of time together as they appear in the local store's account books on the same day, each putting a shot of rum on account. [1] Additionally, his brother James, for many years a doctor in Westerly and Hopkinton, left his brothers Barker and Joshua his clothes that were appraised at $25 in his will following his death in 1856. [2]

      In 1810, Barker married Margaret Champlin, whose family had lands adjacent to his own. [3] Margaret's father, William Champlin, was also active during the Revolution and had a substantial farm similar to the Noyes' property. [4] Barker's mother was still living at the time of his marriage , and Barker and his brothers were supporting her in a very specific way. Col. Joseph Noyes specified
      "two good cows to be kept on farm winter and summer for her use, provisions of every kind that she might chose. Clothing, fresh meat, liquors, sauce that the farm may produce, as much firewood delivered to her room as she needs and wants, and a suitable woman to wait on her and do work for her, executors [sons Thomas and Joseph] are to see to it." [5]

      She died in 1814, and the brothers were still obligated to support Elizabeth [Betsey] their unmarried sister similarly. [6]

      The Noyes brothers were the most significant landholders in the county. Thomas, Joseph, Sanford and Barker had their lands within Westerly, whereas the lands assigned to James and Joshua spanned both Westerly and Hopkinton. [7] During 1815, for example, Barker was assessed $17.94 tax on the $5400 value of his farm. In that year, his brother Thomas was the biggest taxpayer in Westerly in 1815, having been taxed on more than $10,000 worth of assets. [8]

      Barker's oldest brother, Thomas, who was more than 20 years his senior, was a Colonel in the Revolution and later became President of the Washington Trust.

      [1] Sanford Noyes Account Book, 1795-1820, p 3.

      [2] The Learning Company, "Vital Records: Rhode Island, 1500s-1900s" (Family Archive Viewer, CD 215), "R.I.
      Genealogical Register", Vol. 10, Abstracts Westerly Wills, p. 165.

      [3] Westerly, Rhode Island. Town Meetings, Births, Marriages and Earmarks, Vol. 4: p. 612.

      [4] Updike, Wilkins. "A History of the Episcopal Church in Narragansett, Rhode Island". 2nd Edition. D.B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, Boston, 1907. p 216.

      [5] Westerly, Rhode Island, Council and Probate, Vol. 6, p. 179.

      [6] See Washington County Court of Common Pleas, Vol. T, p 376-378, RI Judicial Records Center, Pawtucket, RI.

      [7] Westerly, Rhode Island, Tax records 1820-1830, Westerly Town Records Collection, MS 224; Hopkinton, Rhode Island, Hopkinton Town Records Collection, MS 200, Folder 5,Taxes 1821, RIHSL.

      [8] Washington and Kent Counties 1815 Direct Tax, MSS 232 SG4, Vol. 3, RIHSL.

      Bank. [1] He was a prominent member of the community, was a representative for Westerly as a State Senator and an elector for the electoral college in 1808. [2] He was one of their father's executors, and in charge of supporting his mother and sister, and probably guided his brothers following their father's death. [3] His death in September 1819 may have been the cause of financial difficulties for his younger brothers, particularly, Joshua, James and Barker.

      Following his death, Barker takes out mortgages on his land, and borrowing money, using notes of hand. It is possible that Thomas informally supported his brothers during the tumultuous financial times of the period from 1812 through 1816. In March 1818, Barker purchased 27 acres of land from William and Joseph Dodge. [4] This property included the "Dodge-Hussocks" house, named for the family who built it around 1736 and was surrounded by "hassock-like mounds". [5] The next year, a few months before Thomas's death, he borrowed money from the same 2 men (effectively mortgaging the property he had purchased), and the loan was co-signed by his older brother Sanford. He was then involved in a variety of lawsuits for failure to repay his loans, [6] as well as taking out additional mortgages from his brothers Sanford, James and Joshua, and his mother-in-law Margaret Champlin.

      [7] He was eventually forced to sell his farm and move away. [8]
      Between about 1826 and about 1830, the family moved to Norwich, New London County, Connecticut. [9] His oldest children were now in their teens. He had 5 sons and a daughter by this time, William, Joseph, Robert, David, John and Margaret, all of whom had been born in Westerly, though only 4 of the 6 births were recorded. One son, John D., and a daughter, Mary E., had been born and

      [1] Denison, Frederic, "Westerly and its Witnesses", 1878 p 260.

      [2] Norwich, Connecticut. "The Courier"; 10-12-1808;Volume: XII; Issue: 48; Pg 3; America's Historical Newspapers database online.(accessed 25 Jan. 2011).

      [3] Westerly, Rhode Island, Council and Probate, Vol. 6, p. 179.

      [4] Westerly, Rhode Island, Land Evidence, Vol. 14, p 422, William and Joseph Dodge to Barker Noyes, warranty deed, 27 March 1818; Town Clerk's Office, Westerly.

      [5] Munson,Samuel Lyman, "Weekapaug, RI: Its first one hundred years". The Utter Company, Printers, Westerly, Rhode Island, 1977, p. 9.

      [6] Washington County, Rhode Island, Court of Common Pleas. Vol. S., p 535; Vol. S., p 669;Vol. S., p 672; Vol. S., p 676; Vol. T. p 104; Vol. T. p 105; Vol. T. p 155;Vol. T. p 211; Vol. U, p 327-328; Rhode Island Judicial Records Center,Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The only accessible materials are the record books with summaries of the cases and judgments. The case files for Washington County are inaccessible due to mold and water damage.

      [7] Westerly, Rhode Island, Land Evidence, Vol. 15, p. 292; Vol. 15, p 295-297; Vol.15, p 289-290; Vol. 15, p 362-364.

      [8] Westerly, Rhode Island, Land Evidence, Vol. 15, p 176; Vol. 17, p. 43; Vol. 17, p. 331.

      [9] 1830 U.S. census, New London County, Connecticut, population schedule, Lisbon, p.176, line 23, Barker Noyes; digital images, "Ancestry.com" (www.ancestry.com: accessed 8 Nov 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M19, roll 10.

      died in Westerly, though without leaving a trace in the town records. [1] William Champlin Noyes and Joseph Barker Noyes purchased land in Norwich, which was later deeded to their parents, Barker and Margaret. [2] The property consisted of 58 acres on Canterbury Turnpike. The family is found in surviving tax records from the period. Some of the items that they were taxed on included horse, "neat" cattle, meaning bulls, oxen or cows.

      Barker's son, Joseph B. Noyes, was living in Plainfield when he was taxed in Norwich for the poll tax, cattle and sheep. [3] His son, David, is taxed for 1 timepiece in 1852, [4] and the next year, Barker is taxed for a carriage. [5]

      In 1859, Barker was declared incompetent by the Norwich Probate Court. He was 84 at the time, and his son, David, filed a brief with the court stating that he believed his father could no longer manage his own affairs, "by reason of his age and sickness." [6] Comfort Fillmore and Ebenezer Fuller were appointed conservators of his estate. He and his wife subsequently moved from their farm to a house in town around 1861. [7] Their farm was sold shortly thereafter. [8] Barker died intestate in 1863. His oldest son, William Champlin, remarked on his fathers death as follows:

      17th Saturday Rain hard last night,... E Haney came in evening as far as Mr Metcalfs & and I met him to tell me of the death of my father. C. Latham & wife & Atly here to tell.

      18th Sunday cloudy until 9 A.M. then clear & pleasant went to Norwich with wife & children to funeral of my Father who died at the age of 89 years 7 months & 4 days, having been Born on the 13th day of March AD 1774. he [sic] was the last survivor of the children of Col. Joseph Noyes of Westerly R.I. six sons & two daughters and they all lived to be over 85 yrs

      [1] Not found in Westerly, Rhode Island, Town Meetings, Births, Marriages and Earmarks, Vol. 4, p 612, with other Barker and Margaret Noyes children, but listed in Wheeler, Richard A. "History of the Town of Stonington" p. 494.

      [2] Norwich, Connecticut, Land records, Vol. 45, p 455-456, FHL #0,005,045.

      [3] Norwich, Connecticut, “Norwich Tax Abstracts, 1729-1900. Box 6, 1847 Assessment Ledger, p. 31; Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT.

      [4] Norwich, Connecticut, “Norwich Tax Abstracts, 1729-1900. Box 7, 1852, Assessment Ledger, p. 32; Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT.

      [5] Norwich,Connecticut, “Norwich Tax Abstracts, 1729-1900. Box 7, 1853, Assessment Ledger, p. 31; Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT.

      [6] Norwich,Connecticut, “Probate records v. 21(p.264-end)-23 1857- 1863, Norwich Probate District, Barker Noyes, 1859, Probate Packet No. 8085; FHL #1,310,547.

      [7] John W. Stedman, compiler, Stedman'™s directory of the city and town of Norwich, microfilm reprint, "City Directories of the United States", Norwich 1861-1869,FHL#1930456 (Woodbridge, Connecticut: Research Publications, 1994), (1861) 93,(1862) 85.

      [8] Norwich, Connecticut, Land Evidence, Vol. 66,p 212; FHL #1,398,932.

      old with one exception & that was the oldest Col. Thomas & he died at about 60 having ruined his constitution in the Revolutionary Army. [1]

      Barker and his wife Margaret reportedly had 9 children, 2 of whom died in infancy. [2] Only 4 of the surviving children have their births recorded in the Westerly Town Records. [3] This is higher than average for recorded births before 1853 in Rhode Island, only about 20% of which are estimated to have been recorded. The others, though identified as children of Barker and Margaret by Wheeler, have no recorded birth information. Other indirect evidence found relating to Barker's known children confirms the parentage of Robert Brown, Margaret Drew, and John Dean Noyes.

      All of the children, William Champlin, Joseph Barker, David Marvin, Robert Brown, John D., Margaret and Mary Elizabeth are referenced in William Champlin Noyes' daily diary.

      [1] Noyes, William Champlin, "Papers, 1837-1874," Item 8, Diary 1863-1864; Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, CT.

      [2] Wheeler, Richard A., "History of the Town of Stonington", p. 494.

      [3] Westerly, Rhode Island, Town Meetings, Births, Marriages and Earmarks, Vol. 4, p. 612.


      [Above information compiled by Shellee Morehead].
    Person ID I15322  Noyes Family Genealogy
    Last Modified 1 Nov 2013 

    Father Col. NOYES Joseph,   b. 9 Oct 1727, Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Mar 1802, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother WELLS Barbara "Barbary",   b. 1 Aug 1734,   d. 7 Sep 1814, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 31 Jul 1753  Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 8, 9, 10
    • (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 1753. Rhode Island Marriages From 1744 to 1850 says 31 Jul 1754.)
    Family ID F740  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family CHAMPLIN Margaret,   b. 2 Nov 1791, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jul 1871, Lisbon, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 18 Mar 1810  [2, 10, 11
    • (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 1810.)
    Children 
     1. NOYES William Champlin,   b. 22 Mar 1812, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Sep 1874, Lebanon, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     2. NOYES Joseph Barker,   b. 8 Nov 1814, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1900, Lisbon, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     3. NOYES Margaret,   b. 2 Nov 1816, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jan 1883, Hopkinton, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     4. NOYES John D.,   b. 21 Sep 1818, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Feb 1820, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     5. NOYES Robert Brown,   b. 6 Mar 1821, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Mar 1900, Canterbury, Windham, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     6. NOYES John D.,   b. 26 Sep 1823, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 May 1900, Norwich, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     7. NOYES David Marvin,   b. 30 Dec 1826, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 1897, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     8. NOYES Mary E.,   b. 13 Nov 1828, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1829, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     9. NOYES Mary Elizabeth,   b. 2 Jan 1832, Lisbon, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1900, , , Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 69 years)
    Last Modified 2 Oct 2017 
    Family ID F5840  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 13 Mar 1775 - Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Oct 1863 - Norwich, New London, Connecticut Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Veteran & Patriot of the Revolutionary War
    Veteran & Patriot of the Revolutionary War

  • Sources 
    1. [S6388] Correspondence-Email-MOREHEAD Shellee, RE: Noyes Burial Ground, Weekapaug; Westerly, RI; attached manuscript; 29 October 2013; Paul M. Noyes.

    2. [S103] Book-Noyes-The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II, p.97.

    3. [S1240] Book-Daughters of the American Revolution, p. 43.

    4. [S109] Book-Gen of Desc of Wm. Chesebrough of Boston, p.507.

    5. [S108] Book-History of Stonington, CT, p.490.

    6. [S1906] Letters-Dr. James Noyes for Wm. C. Noyes 1839.

    7. [S1291] VR-Norwich, CT, 10:221.

    8. [S103] Book-Noyes-The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II, p.83.

    9. [S393] Book-Noyes-Gilman Ancestry, p.27.

    10. [S1044] Book-Rhode Island Marriages From 1744 to 1850.

    11. [S1719] Book-Colonial Families Vol. VII, 7:154.